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Surface modification of biomaterials: a quest for blood compatibility.

de Mel A, Cousins BG, Seifalian AM - Int J Biomater (2012)

Bottom Line: Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility.Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications.These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, University College London, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular implants must resist thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia to maintain patency. These implants when in contact with blood face a challenge to oppose the natural coagulation process that becomes activated. Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility. A great deal of research efforts are attributed towards realising such a surface, which comprise of a range of methods on surface modification. Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications. These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium. Nanotechnology is recognising a great role in such surface modification of cardiovascular implants through biofunctionalisation of polymers and peptides in nanocomposites and through nanofabrication of polymers which will pave the way for finding a closer blood match through haemostasis when developing cardiovascular implants with a greater degree of patency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of various physical, chemical, and biofunctionalisation techniques to enhance haemocompatibility. Biofunctionalised surfaces interact with cell surface receptors, that is integrins. Whereas physiochemical modification can influence cell-material interactions through charge, topography, and attractive/repulsive forces due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions [26].
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fig4: Examples of various physical, chemical, and biofunctionalisation techniques to enhance haemocompatibility. Biofunctionalised surfaces interact with cell surface receptors, that is integrins. Whereas physiochemical modification can influence cell-material interactions through charge, topography, and attractive/repulsive forces due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions [26].

Mentions: Figure 4, Table 1 present a summary of the principle methods in applied surface modification techniques. In this way, surface modification can be directed towards optimising the following: (1) protein adsorption (2), the generation of thrombin (and its formation leading to blood coagulation), (3) platelet adhesion (followed by aggregation and activation), and (4) cellular behaviour at the surface of the prosthesis. All strategies are designed to optimise patency-limiting thrombogenic events at the blood-biomaterial interface. For example, vascular graft endothelialisation has been highlighted as the ultimate solution to address thrombogenicity, and its associated complications.


Surface modification of biomaterials: a quest for blood compatibility.

de Mel A, Cousins BG, Seifalian AM - Int J Biomater (2012)

Examples of various physical, chemical, and biofunctionalisation techniques to enhance haemocompatibility. Biofunctionalised surfaces interact with cell surface receptors, that is integrins. Whereas physiochemical modification can influence cell-material interactions through charge, topography, and attractive/repulsive forces due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions [26].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368185&req=5

fig4: Examples of various physical, chemical, and biofunctionalisation techniques to enhance haemocompatibility. Biofunctionalised surfaces interact with cell surface receptors, that is integrins. Whereas physiochemical modification can influence cell-material interactions through charge, topography, and attractive/repulsive forces due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions [26].
Mentions: Figure 4, Table 1 present a summary of the principle methods in applied surface modification techniques. In this way, surface modification can be directed towards optimising the following: (1) protein adsorption (2), the generation of thrombin (and its formation leading to blood coagulation), (3) platelet adhesion (followed by aggregation and activation), and (4) cellular behaviour at the surface of the prosthesis. All strategies are designed to optimise patency-limiting thrombogenic events at the blood-biomaterial interface. For example, vascular graft endothelialisation has been highlighted as the ultimate solution to address thrombogenicity, and its associated complications.

Bottom Line: Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility.Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications.These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, University College London, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular implants must resist thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia to maintain patency. These implants when in contact with blood face a challenge to oppose the natural coagulation process that becomes activated. Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility. A great deal of research efforts are attributed towards realising such a surface, which comprise of a range of methods on surface modification. Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications. These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium. Nanotechnology is recognising a great role in such surface modification of cardiovascular implants through biofunctionalisation of polymers and peptides in nanocomposites and through nanofabrication of polymers which will pave the way for finding a closer blood match through haemostasis when developing cardiovascular implants with a greater degree of patency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus