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Surface modification of biomaterials: a quest for blood compatibility.

de Mel A, Cousins BG, Seifalian AM - Int J Biomater (2012)

Bottom Line: Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility.Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications.These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, University College London, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular implants must resist thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia to maintain patency. These implants when in contact with blood face a challenge to oppose the natural coagulation process that becomes activated. Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility. A great deal of research efforts are attributed towards realising such a surface, which comprise of a range of methods on surface modification. Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications. These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium. Nanotechnology is recognising a great role in such surface modification of cardiovascular implants through biofunctionalisation of polymers and peptides in nanocomposites and through nanofabrication of polymers which will pave the way for finding a closer blood match through haemostasis when developing cardiovascular implants with a greater degree of patency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Main mechanisms influencing blood compatibility.
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fig3: Main mechanisms influencing blood compatibility.

Mentions: Protein adsorption and subsequent cell attachment and behaviour in response to an implanted foreign material is determined by a variety of material properties including surface chemistry, topography, dissolution rate, and the micro-/macromechanical elasticity. Material surface properties can therefore be modified by physicochemical modification and/or biofunctionalisation to promote desirable protein and cellular interactions. Figure 3 summarizes the main mechanisms, which influence blood compatibility.


Surface modification of biomaterials: a quest for blood compatibility.

de Mel A, Cousins BG, Seifalian AM - Int J Biomater (2012)

Main mechanisms influencing blood compatibility.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368185&req=5

fig3: Main mechanisms influencing blood compatibility.
Mentions: Protein adsorption and subsequent cell attachment and behaviour in response to an implanted foreign material is determined by a variety of material properties including surface chemistry, topography, dissolution rate, and the micro-/macromechanical elasticity. Material surface properties can therefore be modified by physicochemical modification and/or biofunctionalisation to promote desirable protein and cellular interactions. Figure 3 summarizes the main mechanisms, which influence blood compatibility.

Bottom Line: Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility.Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications.These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, University College London, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular implants must resist thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia to maintain patency. These implants when in contact with blood face a challenge to oppose the natural coagulation process that becomes activated. Surface protein adsorption and their relevant 3D confirmation greatly determine the degree of blood compatibility. A great deal of research efforts are attributed towards realising such a surface, which comprise of a range of methods on surface modification. Surface modification methods can be broadly categorized as physicochemical modifications and biological modifications. These modifications aim to modulate platelet responses directly through modulation of thrombogenic proteins or by inducing antithrombogenic biomolecules that can be biofunctionalised onto surfaces or through inducing an active endothelium. Nanotechnology is recognising a great role in such surface modification of cardiovascular implants through biofunctionalisation of polymers and peptides in nanocomposites and through nanofabrication of polymers which will pave the way for finding a closer blood match through haemostasis when developing cardiovascular implants with a greater degree of patency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus