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Bicuspid aortic valve disease: a comprehensive review.

Mordi I, Tzemos N - Cardiol Res Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population.This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Cardiovascular Research, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8TA, UK.

ABSTRACT
Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population. This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The basic anatomy of the bicuspid aortic valve.
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fig1: The basic anatomy of the bicuspid aortic valve.

Mentions: The bicuspid valve is composed of two leaflets, of which one is usually larger [7, 8] (Figure 1). The commonest configuration of the bicuspid valve has the two commissures located in an anteroposterior direction giving left and right cusps while slightly less common is having the commissures located on the right and left sides of the annulus leading to anterior and posterior cusps. The most rare, occurring in less than 1% of patients, is due to fusion of the left and non-coronary cusps. A new classification has identified these as type 1, 2, and 3 bicuspid aortic valves [9] (Figure 2). A raphe is present on the right and anterior cusps respectively, and this can make the valve appear tricuspid on echocardiography. The site of cusp fusion can have effects on the prognosis of BAV [10], with the suggestion that type 1 BAVs are more likely to stenose as adults while type 2 valves will have complications at a younger age. The fused valve leaflet in BAV is actually smaller in area than the total area of two separate leaflets would be if the valve were tricuspid.


Bicuspid aortic valve disease: a comprehensive review.

Mordi I, Tzemos N - Cardiol Res Pract (2012)

The basic anatomy of the bicuspid aortic valve.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368178&req=5

fig1: The basic anatomy of the bicuspid aortic valve.
Mentions: The bicuspid valve is composed of two leaflets, of which one is usually larger [7, 8] (Figure 1). The commonest configuration of the bicuspid valve has the two commissures located in an anteroposterior direction giving left and right cusps while slightly less common is having the commissures located on the right and left sides of the annulus leading to anterior and posterior cusps. The most rare, occurring in less than 1% of patients, is due to fusion of the left and non-coronary cusps. A new classification has identified these as type 1, 2, and 3 bicuspid aortic valves [9] (Figure 2). A raphe is present on the right and anterior cusps respectively, and this can make the valve appear tricuspid on echocardiography. The site of cusp fusion can have effects on the prognosis of BAV [10], with the suggestion that type 1 BAVs are more likely to stenose as adults while type 2 valves will have complications at a younger age. The fused valve leaflet in BAV is actually smaller in area than the total area of two separate leaflets would be if the valve were tricuspid.

Bottom Line: Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population.This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Cardiovascular Research, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8TA, UK.

ABSTRACT
Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population. This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus