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Behavior and distribution of heavy metals including rare Earth elements, thorium, and uranium in sludge from industry water treatment plant and recovery method of metals by biosurfactants application.

Gao L, Kano N, Sato Y, Li C, Zhang S, Imaizumi H - Bioinorg Chem Appl (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil.In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals.Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90-100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil. In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals. Consequently, the following matters have been largely clarified. (1) Heavy metallic elements in sludge have generally larger concentrations and exist as more unstable fraction than those in natural soil. (2) Nonionic saponin including carboxyl group is more efficient than sophorolipid for the removal of heavy metals in polluted sludge. Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90-100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution.

No MeSH data available.


The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U. (a) Original sludge. (b) Natural soil C.
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fig4: The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U. (a) Original sludge. (b) Natural soil C.

Mentions: REEs, Th, and U were also extracted from the sludge along with heavy metals and determined with ICP-MS. The concentrations are shown in Table 5, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the triplicated analyses of each sample was less than 10%. The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U is shown in Figure 4 (distribution characteristics of REEs, Th, and U in natural soil A and B are similar to those in natural soil C, so the data for soil A and B are not shown in this figure.). Judging from Table 5, the concentrations of REEs in the sludge are similar to those in natural soil C, while the concentrations of Th and U are smaller than those in natural soil C. On the other hand, the concentrations of metallic elements (except for HREE, i.e., heavy rare earth elements) in sludge are higher than those in natural soil A and B.


Behavior and distribution of heavy metals including rare Earth elements, thorium, and uranium in sludge from industry water treatment plant and recovery method of metals by biosurfactants application.

Gao L, Kano N, Sato Y, Li C, Zhang S, Imaizumi H - Bioinorg Chem Appl (2012)

The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U. (a) Original sludge. (b) Natural soil C.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368164&req=5

fig4: The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U. (a) Original sludge. (b) Natural soil C.
Mentions: REEs, Th, and U were also extracted from the sludge along with heavy metals and determined with ICP-MS. The concentrations are shown in Table 5, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the triplicated analyses of each sample was less than 10%. The relative distribution of REEs, Th, and U is shown in Figure 4 (distribution characteristics of REEs, Th, and U in natural soil A and B are similar to those in natural soil C, so the data for soil A and B are not shown in this figure.). Judging from Table 5, the concentrations of REEs in the sludge are similar to those in natural soil C, while the concentrations of Th and U are smaller than those in natural soil C. On the other hand, the concentrations of metallic elements (except for HREE, i.e., heavy rare earth elements) in sludge are higher than those in natural soil A and B.

Bottom Line: In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil.In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals.Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90-100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil. In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals. Consequently, the following matters have been largely clarified. (1) Heavy metallic elements in sludge have generally larger concentrations and exist as more unstable fraction than those in natural soil. (2) Nonionic saponin including carboxyl group is more efficient than sophorolipid for the removal of heavy metals in polluted sludge. Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90-100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution.

No MeSH data available.