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European bat lyssaviruses, The Netherlands.

Van der Poel WH, Van der Heide R, Verstraten ER, Takumi K, Lina PH, Kramps JA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded.All recent serotine bat specimens clustered with genotype 5 (EBLV1) sequences, and homologies within subgenotypes EBLV1a and EBLV1b were 99.0%-100% and 99.2%-100%, respectively.Our findings indicate that EBLVs of genotype 5 are endemic in the serotine bat in the Netherlands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. wim.vanderpoel@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
To study European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in bat reservoirs in the Netherlands, native bats have been tested for rabies since 1984. For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded. A total of 1,219 serotine bats, Eptesicus serotinus, were tested, and 251 (21%) were positive for lyssavirus antigen. Five (4%) of 129 specimens from the pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, were positive. Recently detected EBLV RNA segments encoding the nucleoprotein were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically (45 specimens). All recent serotine bat specimens clustered with genotype 5 (EBLV1) sequences, and homologies within subgenotypes EBLV1a and EBLV1b were 99.0%-100% and 99.2%-100%, respectively. Our findings indicate that EBLVs of genotype 5 are endemic in the serotine bat in the Netherlands. Since EBLVs can cause fatal infections in humans, all serotine and pond bats involved in contact incidents should be tested to determine whether the victim was exposed to EBLVs.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, with positive (triangles) and negative (dots) test results for European bat lyssaviruses, the Netherlands, 1984–2003.
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Figure 5: Location of pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, with positive (triangles) and negative (dots) test results for European bat lyssaviruses, the Netherlands, 1984–2003.

Mentions: The geographic origin of tested and EBLV-positive serotine and pond bats are depicted in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. The numbers of tested and EBLV-positive serotine bats per year are shown in Figure 1. High homology sequences detected in serotine bats did not show a clustering per year (Figure 2), but EBLV sequences that showed a high degree of homology seemed to have a geographic relationship for at least 2 lineages (clusters 2 and 4, Figure 3). Regarding age and sex, a significantly higher number of EBLV-infected serotine bats were found in the group of adult females, 25% EBLV positives (Table 2).


European bat lyssaviruses, The Netherlands.

Van der Poel WH, Van der Heide R, Verstraten ER, Takumi K, Lina PH, Kramps JA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Location of pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, with positive (triangles) and negative (dots) test results for European bat lyssaviruses, the Netherlands, 1984–2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367619&req=5

Figure 5: Location of pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, with positive (triangles) and negative (dots) test results for European bat lyssaviruses, the Netherlands, 1984–2003.
Mentions: The geographic origin of tested and EBLV-positive serotine and pond bats are depicted in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. The numbers of tested and EBLV-positive serotine bats per year are shown in Figure 1. High homology sequences detected in serotine bats did not show a clustering per year (Figure 2), but EBLV sequences that showed a high degree of homology seemed to have a geographic relationship for at least 2 lineages (clusters 2 and 4, Figure 3). Regarding age and sex, a significantly higher number of EBLV-infected serotine bats were found in the group of adult females, 25% EBLV positives (Table 2).

Bottom Line: For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded.All recent serotine bat specimens clustered with genotype 5 (EBLV1) sequences, and homologies within subgenotypes EBLV1a and EBLV1b were 99.0%-100% and 99.2%-100%, respectively.Our findings indicate that EBLVs of genotype 5 are endemic in the serotine bat in the Netherlands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. wim.vanderpoel@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
To study European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in bat reservoirs in the Netherlands, native bats have been tested for rabies since 1984. For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded. A total of 1,219 serotine bats, Eptesicus serotinus, were tested, and 251 (21%) were positive for lyssavirus antigen. Five (4%) of 129 specimens from the pond bat, Myotis dasycneme, were positive. Recently detected EBLV RNA segments encoding the nucleoprotein were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically (45 specimens). All recent serotine bat specimens clustered with genotype 5 (EBLV1) sequences, and homologies within subgenotypes EBLV1a and EBLV1b were 99.0%-100% and 99.2%-100%, respectively. Our findings indicate that EBLVs of genotype 5 are endemic in the serotine bat in the Netherlands. Since EBLVs can cause fatal infections in humans, all serotine and pond bats involved in contact incidents should be tested to determine whether the victim was exposed to EBLVs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus