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Viral load distribution in SARS outbreak.

Chu CM, Cheng VC, Hung IF, Chan KS, Tang BS, Tsang TH, Chan KH, Yuen KY - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient.This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong.Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
An unprecedented community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in the Amoy Gardens, a high-rise residential complex in Hong Kong. Droplet, air, contaminated fomites, and rodent pests have been proposed to be mechanisms for transmitting SARS in a short period. We studied nasopharyngeal viral load of SARS patients on admission and their geographic distribution. Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient. This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong. Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Numbers of patients in the initial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Amoy Gardens admitted to United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, 2003. The index patient visited Amoy Gardens on March 14 and March 19, 2003.
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Figure 1: Numbers of patients in the initial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Amoy Gardens admitted to United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, 2003. The index patient visited Amoy Gardens on March 14 and March 19, 2003.

Mentions: From March 24 to March 29, 2003, the first 79 SARS patients who lived at Amoy Gardens were admitted to the United Christian Hospital in Hong Kong (Figure 1). Since Amoy Gardens was placed under active surveillance by the health authority soon after the first few cases of SARS were detected, these patients underwent frequent examinations and were admitted early in the course of their illness (7). Their initial clinical signs and symptoms and progress have been previously reported (7). We prospectively collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from these first 79 SARS patients from Amoy Gardens who were admitted to the hospital. The diagnosis of SARS was confirmed by World Health Organization clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. SARS was defined clinically by fever (temperature >38°C), cough or shortness of breath, and new pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs or by high-resolution computed tomographic scans in the absence of an alternative diagnosis to explain the clinical manifestations. Positive SARS diagnostic findings included at least 1 of the following: confirmation by a positive PCR result for SARS-CoV, seroconversion by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunofluorescent antibody assay, or virus isolation in cell culture plus PCR confirmation (7).


Viral load distribution in SARS outbreak.

Chu CM, Cheng VC, Hung IF, Chan KS, Tang BS, Tsang TH, Chan KH, Yuen KY - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Numbers of patients in the initial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Amoy Gardens admitted to United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, 2003. The index patient visited Amoy Gardens on March 14 and March 19, 2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367618&req=5

Figure 1: Numbers of patients in the initial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Amoy Gardens admitted to United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, 2003. The index patient visited Amoy Gardens on March 14 and March 19, 2003.
Mentions: From March 24 to March 29, 2003, the first 79 SARS patients who lived at Amoy Gardens were admitted to the United Christian Hospital in Hong Kong (Figure 1). Since Amoy Gardens was placed under active surveillance by the health authority soon after the first few cases of SARS were detected, these patients underwent frequent examinations and were admitted early in the course of their illness (7). Their initial clinical signs and symptoms and progress have been previously reported (7). We prospectively collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from these first 79 SARS patients from Amoy Gardens who were admitted to the hospital. The diagnosis of SARS was confirmed by World Health Organization clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. SARS was defined clinically by fever (temperature >38°C), cough or shortness of breath, and new pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs or by high-resolution computed tomographic scans in the absence of an alternative diagnosis to explain the clinical manifestations. Positive SARS diagnostic findings included at least 1 of the following: confirmation by a positive PCR result for SARS-CoV, seroconversion by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunofluorescent antibody assay, or virus isolation in cell culture plus PCR confirmation (7).

Bottom Line: Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient.This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong.Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
An unprecedented community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in the Amoy Gardens, a high-rise residential complex in Hong Kong. Droplet, air, contaminated fomites, and rodent pests have been proposed to be mechanisms for transmitting SARS in a short period. We studied nasopharyngeal viral load of SARS patients on admission and their geographic distribution. Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient. This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong. Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus