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International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

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Proportion of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with additional resistance to quinolones, cephalosporin, or trimethoprim, 1992–2001.
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Figure 4: Proportion of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with additional resistance to quinolones, cephalosporin, or trimethoprim, 1992–2001.

Mentions: Finally, we looked at trends in development of additional resistance in the classical penta-resistant phenotype (R-type ACSSuT), with focus on 3 clinically important antimicrobial drug classes: quinolones, cephalosporins, and trimethoprim. Both quinolone and trimethoprim resistance increased in MDR DT104 throughout the study period. In 1992, nalidixic acid susceptibility testing was performed on a total of 194 MDR DT104 isolates in 4 different countries; no resistant isolates were found. In 2001, nalidixic acid susceptibility testing of 1,812 MDR DT104 strains in 11 countries identified 109 (6.0%) resistant strains. Similarly, trimethoprim resistance was found in 1.2% of the 180 MDR DT104 strains tested in 1992, but in 6.6% of 1,855 MDR DT104 strains tested in 2001. Cephalosporin-resistant MDR DT104 remained rare, with only 0.5% resistant strains in 2001, and no clear trend observable. Figure 4 shows the overall trend of resistance to quinolone, trimethoprim, and cephalosporins from 1992 to 2001. The increase in quinolone resistance seen in 1996 and in 1998 was caused by a general increase in quinolone-resistant MDR DT104 in Scotland and an outbreak of quinolone-resistant MDR DT104 in Denmark (14), respectively. The increase in trimethoprim resistance from 1995 to 1996 was also caused by a general increase in trimethoprim-resistant MDR DT104 in Scotland.


International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Proportion of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with additional resistance to quinolones, cephalosporin, or trimethoprim, 1992–2001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367607&req=5

Figure 4: Proportion of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with additional resistance to quinolones, cephalosporin, or trimethoprim, 1992–2001.
Mentions: Finally, we looked at trends in development of additional resistance in the classical penta-resistant phenotype (R-type ACSSuT), with focus on 3 clinically important antimicrobial drug classes: quinolones, cephalosporins, and trimethoprim. Both quinolone and trimethoprim resistance increased in MDR DT104 throughout the study period. In 1992, nalidixic acid susceptibility testing was performed on a total of 194 MDR DT104 isolates in 4 different countries; no resistant isolates were found. In 2001, nalidixic acid susceptibility testing of 1,812 MDR DT104 strains in 11 countries identified 109 (6.0%) resistant strains. Similarly, trimethoprim resistance was found in 1.2% of the 180 MDR DT104 strains tested in 1992, but in 6.6% of 1,855 MDR DT104 strains tested in 2001. Cephalosporin-resistant MDR DT104 remained rare, with only 0.5% resistant strains in 2001, and no clear trend observable. Figure 4 shows the overall trend of resistance to quinolone, trimethoprim, and cephalosporins from 1992 to 2001. The increase in quinolone resistance seen in 1996 and in 1998 was caused by a general increase in quinolone-resistant MDR DT104 in Scotland and an outbreak of quinolone-resistant MDR DT104 in Denmark (14), respectively. The increase in trimethoprim resistance from 1995 to 1996 was also caused by a general increase in trimethoprim-resistant MDR DT104 in Scotland.

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus