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International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

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Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a percentage of all S. Typhimurium in 9 world regions, 1992–2001. Only countries that had data available for 2 or more 2-year periods are included: United Kingdom and Ireland: Scotland and Ireland; Scandinavia and the Baltics: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Latvia; Western Europe: Austria, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands; Eastern Europe: Czech Republic and Hungary; Southern Europe: Greece, Malta, and Spain; North America: Canada, United States; South America: Brazil; Eastern Asia: the Republic of Korea; Oceania: Australia.
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Figure 3: Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a percentage of all S. Typhimurium in 9 world regions, 1992–2001. Only countries that had data available for 2 or more 2-year periods are included: United Kingdom and Ireland: Scotland and Ireland; Scandinavia and the Baltics: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Latvia; Western Europe: Austria, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands; Eastern Europe: Czech Republic and Hungary; Southern Europe: Greece, Malta, and Spain; North America: Canada, United States; South America: Brazil; Eastern Asia: the Republic of Korea; Oceania: Australia.

Mentions: Table 2 shows the distribution of MDR S. Typhimurium presented as 2-year time-bands. Figure 3 depicts the general trend, with countries divided into 9 different regions. In 1992 15% of all S. Typhimurium isolates were MDR; by 2001, this percentage had increased 3-fold to 42%. Once again, large variations occurred between countries and within countries from year to year. In most European countries and North America, MDR S. Typhimurium was common and, with the exception of the United Kingdom and Ireland, multidrug resistance increased from the mid-1990s to the end of the study period. For example, in 2001 multidrug resistance ranged from 22% (Greece) to 72% (Ireland). Only limited data were available from Brazil, the Caribbean region, South Africa, and the Republic of Korea. However, in these regions multidrug resistance was far less common, ranging from zero in the Caribbean region to 19% in the Republic of Korea. In Australia, multidrug resistance remained low throughout the period, with 1.0% of strains in 1997 and 3.6% in 2001.


International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a percentage of all S. Typhimurium in 9 world regions, 1992–2001. Only countries that had data available for 2 or more 2-year periods are included: United Kingdom and Ireland: Scotland and Ireland; Scandinavia and the Baltics: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Latvia; Western Europe: Austria, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands; Eastern Europe: Czech Republic and Hungary; Southern Europe: Greece, Malta, and Spain; North America: Canada, United States; South America: Brazil; Eastern Asia: the Republic of Korea; Oceania: Australia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367607&req=5

Figure 3: Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a percentage of all S. Typhimurium in 9 world regions, 1992–2001. Only countries that had data available for 2 or more 2-year periods are included: United Kingdom and Ireland: Scotland and Ireland; Scandinavia and the Baltics: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Latvia; Western Europe: Austria, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands; Eastern Europe: Czech Republic and Hungary; Southern Europe: Greece, Malta, and Spain; North America: Canada, United States; South America: Brazil; Eastern Asia: the Republic of Korea; Oceania: Australia.
Mentions: Table 2 shows the distribution of MDR S. Typhimurium presented as 2-year time-bands. Figure 3 depicts the general trend, with countries divided into 9 different regions. In 1992 15% of all S. Typhimurium isolates were MDR; by 2001, this percentage had increased 3-fold to 42%. Once again, large variations occurred between countries and within countries from year to year. In most European countries and North America, MDR S. Typhimurium was common and, with the exception of the United Kingdom and Ireland, multidrug resistance increased from the mid-1990s to the end of the study period. For example, in 2001 multidrug resistance ranged from 22% (Greece) to 72% (Ireland). Only limited data were available from Brazil, the Caribbean region, South Africa, and the Republic of Korea. However, in these regions multidrug resistance was far less common, ranging from zero in the Caribbean region to 19% in the Republic of Korea. In Australia, multidrug resistance remained low throughout the period, with 1.0% of strains in 1997 and 3.6% in 2001.

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus