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International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

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Participating countries in the survey of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, 1992–2001, internationally (A) and in Europe (B).
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Figure 1: Participating countries in the survey of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, 1992–2001, internationally (A) and in Europe (B).

Mentions: The questionnaire was sent to 52 countries, and a completed questionnaire was received from 29, a response rate of 56% (Figure 1). Of the 52 invited countries, 23 were members of or affiliated with Enter-Net; from these a positive feedback was received from 20 (87%). These countries were Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England and Wales, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The 8 countries and 1 regional center (31% response rate) that participated in the survey that were not associated with Enter-Net when data were collected were Brazil, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, Latvia, Malta, Republic of South Korea, United States, and the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC), a regional center that represents 21 countries in the Caribbean (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos). For the purpose of this study, CAREC was treated as 1 unit. The 29 participating countries had a total population of 1.028 billion in 2001.


International Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 infections, 1992-2001.

Helms M, Ethelberg S, Mølbak K, DT104 Study Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Participating countries in the survey of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, 1992–2001, internationally (A) and in Europe (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367607&req=5

Figure 1: Participating countries in the survey of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, 1992–2001, internationally (A) and in Europe (B).
Mentions: The questionnaire was sent to 52 countries, and a completed questionnaire was received from 29, a response rate of 56% (Figure 1). Of the 52 invited countries, 23 were members of or affiliated with Enter-Net; from these a positive feedback was received from 20 (87%). These countries were Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England and Wales, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The 8 countries and 1 regional center (31% response rate) that participated in the survey that were not associated with Enter-Net when data were collected were Brazil, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, Latvia, Malta, Republic of South Korea, United States, and the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC), a regional center that represents 21 countries in the Caribbean (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos). For the purpose of this study, CAREC was treated as 1 unit. The 29 participating countries had a total population of 1.028 billion in 2001.

Bottom Line: Typhimurium was increasing.This survey implies that MDR S.Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mhe@ssi.dk

ABSTRACT
The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium infections in humans, and in particular MDR definitive phage type 104 (DT104), has increased substantially in many countries in the last 2 decades, often associated with increased illness. To examine the magnitude of this problem, a survey was conducted among countries with available antimicrobial resistance or phage typing surveillance data. A total of 29, primarily industrialized, countries participated in the survey, which covered the years 1992-2001. Overall, the incidence of MDR S. Typhimurium and DT104 increased continuously during this period, although the problem affected primarily Europe and North America. The increase appeared to have peaked in the United Kingdom but not in other countries. Also, the incidence of quinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium was increasing. This survey implies that MDR S. Typhimurium constitutes an increasing public health problem in large parts of the world and emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control programs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus