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Clinician knowledge and beliefs after statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use.

Kiang KM, Kieke BA, Como-Sabetti K, Lynfield R, Besser RE, Belongia EA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Results of pre- (1999) and post- (2002) campaign questionnaires indicated that Wisconsin clinicians perceived a significant decline in the proportion of patients requesting antimicrobial drugs (50% in 1999 to 30% in 2002; p<0.001) and in antimicrobial drug requests from parents for children (25% in 1999 to 20% in 2002; p = 0.004).For the comparable pediatric case scenarios, only Wisconsin clinicians improved significantly from 1999 to 2002.Although clinicians in both states improved on several survey responses, greater overall improvement occurred in Wisconsin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

ABSTRACT
In 1999, Wisconsin initiated an educational campaign for primary care clinicians and the public to promote judicious antimicrobial drug use. We evaluated its impact on clinician knowledge and beliefs; Minnesota served as a control state. Results of pre- (1999) and post- (2002) campaign questionnaires indicated that Wisconsin clinicians perceived a significant decline in the proportion of patients requesting antimicrobial drugs (50% in 1999 to 30% in 2002; p<0.001) and in antimicrobial drug requests from parents for children (25% in 1999 to 20% in 2002; p = 0.004). Wisconsin clinicians were less influenced by nonpredictive clinical findings (purulent nasal discharge [p = 0.044], productive cough [p = 0.010]) in terms of antimicrobial drug prescribing. In 2002, clinicians from both states were less likely to recommend antimicrobial agent treatment for the adult case scenarios of viral respiratory illness. For the comparable pediatric case scenarios, only Wisconsin clinicians improved significantly from 1999 to 2002. Although clinicians in both states improved on several survey responses, greater overall improvement occurred in Wisconsin.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of clinicians reporting various estimates of the percentage of parents of their pediatric patients who requested antimicrobial drugs for their child's cough, cold, or flulike symptoms in 1999 and 2002.
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Figure 3: Proportion of clinicians reporting various estimates of the percentage of parents of their pediatric patients who requested antimicrobial drugs for their child's cough, cold, or flulike symptoms in 1999 and 2002.

Mentions: Baseline responses were compared for Wisconsin and Minnesota in 1999, before initiation of the WARN campaign in Wisconsin. Clinicians in Wisconsin and Minnesota perceived similar proportions of their adult patients requesting antimicrobial agents (p = 0.217) (Figure 2). The median percentage of patients perceived to request antimicrobial agents was 50% in Wisconsin and 40% in Minnesota; this difference was not significant. The perceived demand by parents for antimicrobial agents to treat their child's respiratory illness was also similar between the 2 states (p = 0.473) (Figure 3); the median reported percentage of parents requesting antimicrobial agents was 25% in both states.


Clinician knowledge and beliefs after statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use.

Kiang KM, Kieke BA, Como-Sabetti K, Lynfield R, Besser RE, Belongia EA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Proportion of clinicians reporting various estimates of the percentage of parents of their pediatric patients who requested antimicrobial drugs for their child's cough, cold, or flulike symptoms in 1999 and 2002.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367606&req=5

Figure 3: Proportion of clinicians reporting various estimates of the percentage of parents of their pediatric patients who requested antimicrobial drugs for their child's cough, cold, or flulike symptoms in 1999 and 2002.
Mentions: Baseline responses were compared for Wisconsin and Minnesota in 1999, before initiation of the WARN campaign in Wisconsin. Clinicians in Wisconsin and Minnesota perceived similar proportions of their adult patients requesting antimicrobial agents (p = 0.217) (Figure 2). The median percentage of patients perceived to request antimicrobial agents was 50% in Wisconsin and 40% in Minnesota; this difference was not significant. The perceived demand by parents for antimicrobial agents to treat their child's respiratory illness was also similar between the 2 states (p = 0.473) (Figure 3); the median reported percentage of parents requesting antimicrobial agents was 25% in both states.

Bottom Line: Results of pre- (1999) and post- (2002) campaign questionnaires indicated that Wisconsin clinicians perceived a significant decline in the proportion of patients requesting antimicrobial drugs (50% in 1999 to 30% in 2002; p<0.001) and in antimicrobial drug requests from parents for children (25% in 1999 to 20% in 2002; p = 0.004).For the comparable pediatric case scenarios, only Wisconsin clinicians improved significantly from 1999 to 2002.Although clinicians in both states improved on several survey responses, greater overall improvement occurred in Wisconsin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

ABSTRACT
In 1999, Wisconsin initiated an educational campaign for primary care clinicians and the public to promote judicious antimicrobial drug use. We evaluated its impact on clinician knowledge and beliefs; Minnesota served as a control state. Results of pre- (1999) and post- (2002) campaign questionnaires indicated that Wisconsin clinicians perceived a significant decline in the proportion of patients requesting antimicrobial drugs (50% in 1999 to 30% in 2002; p<0.001) and in antimicrobial drug requests from parents for children (25% in 1999 to 20% in 2002; p = 0.004). Wisconsin clinicians were less influenced by nonpredictive clinical findings (purulent nasal discharge [p = 0.044], productive cough [p = 0.010]) in terms of antimicrobial drug prescribing. In 2002, clinicians from both states were less likely to recommend antimicrobial agent treatment for the adult case scenarios of viral respiratory illness. For the comparable pediatric case scenarios, only Wisconsin clinicians improved significantly from 1999 to 2002. Although clinicians in both states improved on several survey responses, greater overall improvement occurred in Wisconsin.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus