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Impact of statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use.

Belongia EA, Knobloch MJ, Kieke BA, Davis JP, Janette C, Besser RE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: Prescribing by internists declined significantly more in Wisconsin than Minnesota, but the opposite was true for pediatricians.We conclude that the secular trend of declining antimicrobial drug use continued through 2003, but a large-scale educational program did not generate greater reductions in Wisconsin despite improved knowledge.State and local organizations should consider a balanced approach that includes limited statewide educational activities with increasing emphasis on local, provider-level interventions and policy development to promote careful antimicrobial drug use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin 54449, USA. belongia.edward@marshfieldclinic.org

ABSTRACT
The Wisconsin Antibiotic Resistance Network (WARN) was launched in 1999 to educate physicians and the public about judicious antimicrobial drug use. Public education included radio and television advertisements, posters, pamphlets, and presentations at childcare centers. Physician education included mailings, susceptibility reports, practice guidelines, satellite conferences, and presentations. We analyzed antimicrobial prescribing data for primary care physicians in Wisconsin and Minnesota (control state). Antimicrobial prescribing declined 19.8% in Minnesota and 20.4% in Wisconsin from 1998 to 2003. Prescribing by internists declined significantly more in Wisconsin than Minnesota, but the opposite was true for pediatricians. We conclude that the secular trend of declining antimicrobial drug use continued through 2003, but a large-scale educational program did not generate greater reductions in Wisconsin despite improved knowledge. State and local organizations should consider a balanced approach that includes limited statewide educational activities with increasing emphasis on local, provider-level interventions and policy development to promote careful antimicrobial drug use.

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Temporal trends in per capita antimicrobial drug sales and the mean number of prescriptions per physician in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Temporal trends in per capita antimicrobial drug sales and the mean number of prescriptions per physician in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Mentions: The 4,115 primary care physicians in long-term practice included 2,009 (49%) in Minnesota and 2,106 (51%) in Wisconsin. The proportion of physicians in family practice was higher in Wisconsin, and the proportion in internal medicine was higher in Minnesota (Table 3). During 1998, these physicians generated 1.5 million prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs in each state, and the crude antimicrobial prescribing rate was nearly identical across states. From 2000 through 2003, the prescribing rate for antimicrobial drugs in both states gradually declined (Figure 1). From 1998 to 2003, the antimicrobial prescribing rate was reduced by 19.8% in Minnesota and by 20.4% in Wisconsin. The percentage reduction was 19.5% and 18.6%, respectively, in the secondary analysis, which included the 12,790 primary care physicians who prescribed antimicrobial drugs at any time during the follow-up period.


Impact of statewide program to promote appropriate antimicrobial drug use.

Belongia EA, Knobloch MJ, Kieke BA, Davis JP, Janette C, Besser RE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Temporal trends in per capita antimicrobial drug sales and the mean number of prescriptions per physician in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367605&req=5

Figure 1: Temporal trends in per capita antimicrobial drug sales and the mean number of prescriptions per physician in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Mentions: The 4,115 primary care physicians in long-term practice included 2,009 (49%) in Minnesota and 2,106 (51%) in Wisconsin. The proportion of physicians in family practice was higher in Wisconsin, and the proportion in internal medicine was higher in Minnesota (Table 3). During 1998, these physicians generated 1.5 million prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs in each state, and the crude antimicrobial prescribing rate was nearly identical across states. From 2000 through 2003, the prescribing rate for antimicrobial drugs in both states gradually declined (Figure 1). From 1998 to 2003, the antimicrobial prescribing rate was reduced by 19.8% in Minnesota and by 20.4% in Wisconsin. The percentage reduction was 19.5% and 18.6%, respectively, in the secondary analysis, which included the 12,790 primary care physicians who prescribed antimicrobial drugs at any time during the follow-up period.

Bottom Line: Prescribing by internists declined significantly more in Wisconsin than Minnesota, but the opposite was true for pediatricians.We conclude that the secular trend of declining antimicrobial drug use continued through 2003, but a large-scale educational program did not generate greater reductions in Wisconsin despite improved knowledge.State and local organizations should consider a balanced approach that includes limited statewide educational activities with increasing emphasis on local, provider-level interventions and policy development to promote careful antimicrobial drug use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin 54449, USA. belongia.edward@marshfieldclinic.org

ABSTRACT
The Wisconsin Antibiotic Resistance Network (WARN) was launched in 1999 to educate physicians and the public about judicious antimicrobial drug use. Public education included radio and television advertisements, posters, pamphlets, and presentations at childcare centers. Physician education included mailings, susceptibility reports, practice guidelines, satellite conferences, and presentations. We analyzed antimicrobial prescribing data for primary care physicians in Wisconsin and Minnesota (control state). Antimicrobial prescribing declined 19.8% in Minnesota and 20.4% in Wisconsin from 1998 to 2003. Prescribing by internists declined significantly more in Wisconsin than Minnesota, but the opposite was true for pediatricians. We conclude that the secular trend of declining antimicrobial drug use continued through 2003, but a large-scale educational program did not generate greater reductions in Wisconsin despite improved knowledge. State and local organizations should consider a balanced approach that includes limited statewide educational activities with increasing emphasis on local, provider-level interventions and policy development to promote careful antimicrobial drug use.

Show MeSH