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The Nearctic-Caribbean species Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius, 1801): Larval descriptions with a diagnosis of immature Ctenodactylini and natural history notes on the genus and tribe (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

Erwin TL, White WH - Zookeys (2012)

Bottom Line: Both adult and larval Leptotrachelus dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius), and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf sheaths of that and other grass-like species.The geographic range of Leptotrachelus dorsalis extends from Kansas in the west to the Atlantic seaboard, north as far as Ontario, Canada and south to Cuba; it is an eastern species of North America and the Caribbean.Larval character attributes that are shared with a related ctenodactyline, Askalaphium depressum (Bates), provide a preliminary basis for characterization of the immatures of tribe Ctenodactylini.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hyper-diversity Group, Department of Entomology, MRC-187, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, P.O. Box 37012, DC 20013-7012, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adults and larvae of Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius), the Sugarcane Savior Beetle, live in association with grasses, the larvae in the appressed leaf axils. Both adult and larval Leptotrachelus dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius), and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf sheaths of that and other grass-like species. The geographic range of Leptotrachelus dorsalis extends from Kansas in the west to the Atlantic seaboard, north as far as Ontario, Canada and south to Cuba; it is an eastern species of North America and the Caribbean. Larval character attributes that are shared with a related ctenodactyline, Askalaphium depressum (Bates), provide a preliminary basis for characterization of the immatures of tribe Ctenodactylini.

No MeSH data available.


Larval head capsule (L3), parietale (PA), frontale (FR), dorsal aspect of Askalaphium depressum (Bates). This illustration was inadvertently left out of Erwin and Medina (2003); see references therein. Scale line equals 0.5 mm.
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Figure 14: Larval head capsule (L3), parietale (PA), frontale (FR), dorsal aspect of Askalaphium depressum (Bates). This illustration was inadvertently left out of Erwin and Medina (2003); see references therein. Scale line equals 0.5 mm.

Mentions: Recognition. (See Erwin and Medina 2003, and Fig. 14 herein for illustrations of Askalaphium depressum)Head and body depressed, markedly so in Askalaphium depressum, much less so in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. Head wider than prothorax in Askalaphium depressum, coequal in width in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. First instars of Askalaphium depressum unknown, in first instar of Leptotrachelus dorsalis frontal piece with long U-shaped row of short stiff setae likely used as an egg burster. Frontale slightly produced medially, toothed or shallowly bilobed. Neck slightly to moderately constricted, short and broad, cervical groove and keel distinct. Mandible with inner edge of blade and posterior margin of retinaculum moderately serrate (3rd instar). Maxilla with inner lobe present, unisetose, seta 2× length of lobe in Askalaphium depressum, absent and devoid of seta in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. Labium markedly produced medially and unisetose. Antennomere 3 with small tubercule laterad near apex (not a hyaline bulb). Segment IX with two stout curved setae ventrally; urogomphi non-segmented, multi-nodose, infuscated. Pygopod with marked triangular patch of setae postero-ventrally.


The Nearctic-Caribbean species Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius, 1801): Larval descriptions with a diagnosis of immature Ctenodactylini and natural history notes on the genus and tribe (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

Erwin TL, White WH - Zookeys (2012)

Larval head capsule (L3), parietale (PA), frontale (FR), dorsal aspect of Askalaphium depressum (Bates). This illustration was inadvertently left out of Erwin and Medina (2003); see references therein. Scale line equals 0.5 mm.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367566&req=5

Figure 14: Larval head capsule (L3), parietale (PA), frontale (FR), dorsal aspect of Askalaphium depressum (Bates). This illustration was inadvertently left out of Erwin and Medina (2003); see references therein. Scale line equals 0.5 mm.
Mentions: Recognition. (See Erwin and Medina 2003, and Fig. 14 herein for illustrations of Askalaphium depressum)Head and body depressed, markedly so in Askalaphium depressum, much less so in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. Head wider than prothorax in Askalaphium depressum, coequal in width in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. First instars of Askalaphium depressum unknown, in first instar of Leptotrachelus dorsalis frontal piece with long U-shaped row of short stiff setae likely used as an egg burster. Frontale slightly produced medially, toothed or shallowly bilobed. Neck slightly to moderately constricted, short and broad, cervical groove and keel distinct. Mandible with inner edge of blade and posterior margin of retinaculum moderately serrate (3rd instar). Maxilla with inner lobe present, unisetose, seta 2× length of lobe in Askalaphium depressum, absent and devoid of seta in Leptotrachelus dorsalis. Labium markedly produced medially and unisetose. Antennomere 3 with small tubercule laterad near apex (not a hyaline bulb). Segment IX with two stout curved setae ventrally; urogomphi non-segmented, multi-nodose, infuscated. Pygopod with marked triangular patch of setae postero-ventrally.

Bottom Line: Both adult and larval Leptotrachelus dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius), and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf sheaths of that and other grass-like species.The geographic range of Leptotrachelus dorsalis extends from Kansas in the west to the Atlantic seaboard, north as far as Ontario, Canada and south to Cuba; it is an eastern species of North America and the Caribbean.Larval character attributes that are shared with a related ctenodactyline, Askalaphium depressum (Bates), provide a preliminary basis for characterization of the immatures of tribe Ctenodactylini.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hyper-diversity Group, Department of Entomology, MRC-187, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, P.O. Box 37012, DC 20013-7012, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adults and larvae of Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius), the Sugarcane Savior Beetle, live in association with grasses, the larvae in the appressed leaf axils. Both adult and larval Leptotrachelus dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius), and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf sheaths of that and other grass-like species. The geographic range of Leptotrachelus dorsalis extends from Kansas in the west to the Atlantic seaboard, north as far as Ontario, Canada and south to Cuba; it is an eastern species of North America and the Caribbean. Larval character attributes that are shared with a related ctenodactyline, Askalaphium depressum (Bates), provide a preliminary basis for characterization of the immatures of tribe Ctenodactylini.

No MeSH data available.