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Rift Valley fever in small ruminants, Senegal, 2003.

Chevalier V, Lancelot R, Thiongane Y, Sall B, Diaité A, Mondet B - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: No outbreak was detected by the surveillance system.Rift Valley fever surveillance should be improved to allow early detection of virus activity.Ruminant vaccination programs should be prepared to confront the foreseeable higher risks for future epidemics of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre International de Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement, Montpellier, France. verochevalier@sentoo.sn

ABSTRACT
During the 2003 rainy season, the clinical and serologic incidence of Rift Valley fever was assessed in small ruminant herds living around temporary ponds located in the semi-arid region of the Ferlo, Senegal. No outbreak was detected by the surveillance system. Serologic incidence was estimated at 2.9% (95% confidence interval 1.0-8.7) and occurred in 5 of 7 ponds with large variations in the observed incidence rate (0%-20.3%). The location of ponds in the Ferlo Valley and small ponds were correlated with higher serologic incidence (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.005, respectively). Rift Valley fever surveillance should be improved to allow early detection of virus activity. Ruminant vaccination programs should be prepared to confront the foreseeable higher risks for future epidemics of this disease.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of ponds and settlements for the study of Rift Valley fever serologic incidence in 610 small ruminants during the 2003 rainy season in the Barkedji area, Senegal.
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Figure 2: Location of ponds and settlements for the study of Rift Valley fever serologic incidence in 610 small ruminants during the 2003 rainy season in the Barkedji area, Senegal.

Mentions: The survey area (Figures 1 and 2) was a 40-km diameter circle centered on the village of Barkedji (14°52´W, 15°16´N). The shrubby vegetation and hot, dry climate were typically Sahelian, with annual rainfall ranging from 300 to 500 mm, which occurred from July to October. The soil was made of a lateritic crust partially covered by flattened sandy dunes, stabilized by the vegetation. This plateau was eroded by a former effluent of the Senegal River, the Ferlo, which stopped flowing at the end of the last humid Saharan period (Neolithic era). The erosion left a large, fossil valley that crosses the study area from east to west with former effluents coming from the north and the south.


Rift Valley fever in small ruminants, Senegal, 2003.

Chevalier V, Lancelot R, Thiongane Y, Sall B, Diaité A, Mondet B - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Location of ponds and settlements for the study of Rift Valley fever serologic incidence in 610 small ruminants during the 2003 rainy season in the Barkedji area, Senegal.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367374&req=5

Figure 2: Location of ponds and settlements for the study of Rift Valley fever serologic incidence in 610 small ruminants during the 2003 rainy season in the Barkedji area, Senegal.
Mentions: The survey area (Figures 1 and 2) was a 40-km diameter circle centered on the village of Barkedji (14°52´W, 15°16´N). The shrubby vegetation and hot, dry climate were typically Sahelian, with annual rainfall ranging from 300 to 500 mm, which occurred from July to October. The soil was made of a lateritic crust partially covered by flattened sandy dunes, stabilized by the vegetation. This plateau was eroded by a former effluent of the Senegal River, the Ferlo, which stopped flowing at the end of the last humid Saharan period (Neolithic era). The erosion left a large, fossil valley that crosses the study area from east to west with former effluents coming from the north and the south.

Bottom Line: No outbreak was detected by the surveillance system.Rift Valley fever surveillance should be improved to allow early detection of virus activity.Ruminant vaccination programs should be prepared to confront the foreseeable higher risks for future epidemics of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre International de Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement, Montpellier, France. verochevalier@sentoo.sn

ABSTRACT
During the 2003 rainy season, the clinical and serologic incidence of Rift Valley fever was assessed in small ruminant herds living around temporary ponds located in the semi-arid region of the Ferlo, Senegal. No outbreak was detected by the surveillance system. Serologic incidence was estimated at 2.9% (95% confidence interval 1.0-8.7) and occurred in 5 of 7 ponds with large variations in the observed incidence rate (0%-20.3%). The location of ponds in the Ferlo Valley and small ponds were correlated with higher serologic incidence (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.005, respectively). Rift Valley fever surveillance should be improved to allow early detection of virus activity. Ruminant vaccination programs should be prepared to confront the foreseeable higher risks for future epidemics of this disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus