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Respiratory infections during SARS outbreak, Hong Kong, 2003.

Lo JY, Tsang TH, Leung YH, Yeung EY, Wu T, Lim WW - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: The effect of community hygienic measures during the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong was studied by comparing the proportion of positive specimens of various respiratory viruses in 2003 with those from 1998 to 2002.Community hygienic measures significantly reduced the incidence of various respiratory viral infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Division, Public Health Laboratory Centre, Department of Health, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, 382 Nam Cheong Street, Shek Kip Mei, Kowloon, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The effect of community hygienic measures during the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong was studied by comparing the proportion of positive specimens of various respiratory viruses in 2003 with those from 1998 to 2002. Community hygienic measures significantly reduced the incidence of various respiratory viral infections.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of positive specimens by month, 1998–2003, for A) influenza virus, B) respiratory syncytial virus, C) parainfluenza virus, and D) adenovirus.
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Figure 2: Proportion of positive specimens by month, 1998–2003, for A) influenza virus, B) respiratory syncytial virus, C) parainfluenza virus, and D) adenovirus.

Mentions: The 2003 SARS outbreak overlapped with the traditional seasonal peak from March to September for RSV in Hong Kong (8). In 2003, the RSV peak season shifted to August–October. The accumulation of susceptible infants offset the infection control measures instituted against respiratory infections as well as the normal seasonality; as a result, RSV activity increased in the late months of 2003. Figure 2 illustrates the usual seasonal variation of the 4 respiratory viruses and their pattern from 1998 to 2003.


Respiratory infections during SARS outbreak, Hong Kong, 2003.

Lo JY, Tsang TH, Leung YH, Yeung EY, Wu T, Lim WW - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Proportion of positive specimens by month, 1998–2003, for A) influenza virus, B) respiratory syncytial virus, C) parainfluenza virus, and D) adenovirus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367357&req=5

Figure 2: Proportion of positive specimens by month, 1998–2003, for A) influenza virus, B) respiratory syncytial virus, C) parainfluenza virus, and D) adenovirus.
Mentions: The 2003 SARS outbreak overlapped with the traditional seasonal peak from March to September for RSV in Hong Kong (8). In 2003, the RSV peak season shifted to August–October. The accumulation of susceptible infants offset the infection control measures instituted against respiratory infections as well as the normal seasonality; as a result, RSV activity increased in the late months of 2003. Figure 2 illustrates the usual seasonal variation of the 4 respiratory viruses and their pattern from 1998 to 2003.

Bottom Line: The effect of community hygienic measures during the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong was studied by comparing the proportion of positive specimens of various respiratory viruses in 2003 with those from 1998 to 2002.Community hygienic measures significantly reduced the incidence of various respiratory viral infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Division, Public Health Laboratory Centre, Department of Health, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, 382 Nam Cheong Street, Shek Kip Mei, Kowloon, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The effect of community hygienic measures during the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong was studied by comparing the proportion of positive specimens of various respiratory viruses in 2003 with those from 1998 to 2002. Community hygienic measures significantly reduced the incidence of various respiratory viral infections.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus