Limits...
Tickborne relapsing fever in Israel.

Sidi G, Davidovitch N, Balicer RD, Anis E, Grotto I, Schwartz E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Bottom Line: We evaluated the epidemiology of relapsing fever from 1971 to 2003 in Israel.In civilians, incidence declined from 0.35 to 0.11 cases per 100,000 persons annually; in military personnel it averaged 6.4 cases per 100,000 persons annually.These data imply that the pathogen and vector continue to exist in Israel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the epidemiology of relapsing fever from 1971 to 2003 in Israel. In civilians, incidence declined from 0.35 to 0.11 cases per 100,000 persons annually; in military personnel it averaged 6.4 cases per 100,000 persons annually. These data imply that the pathogen and vector continue to exist in Israel.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Civilian yearly incidence of tickborne relapsing fever, Israel, 1951–2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367340&req=5

Figure 2: Civilian yearly incidence of tickborne relapsing fever, Israel, 1951–2003.

Mentions: This study has shown a decrease in the incidence of TBRF in civilians, with no similar decrease in soldiers. This decrease becomes even more evident when compared to the incidence in Israel during the 1950s and 1960s (Figure 2). That the incidence has remained similar over time among military personnel indicates that the pathogen and the vector continue to exist in Israel and that soldiers are at a high risk of contracting it because of their activities. Infection has occurred although Israel Defense Force commanders are aware of TBRF and all soldiers and commanders receive annual guidelines on preventing TBRF. Furthermore, entering caves is prohibited, and most TBRF cases in the military (67%) were not due to cave exposure. The declining incidence among civilians is likely due to a decrease in the rate of exposure with increased urbanization. A civilian subpopulation that continues to be at risk is schoolchildren; most cases occurred after field trips.


Tickborne relapsing fever in Israel.

Sidi G, Davidovitch N, Balicer RD, Anis E, Grotto I, Schwartz E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2005)

Civilian yearly incidence of tickborne relapsing fever, Israel, 1951–2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367340&req=5

Figure 2: Civilian yearly incidence of tickborne relapsing fever, Israel, 1951–2003.
Mentions: This study has shown a decrease in the incidence of TBRF in civilians, with no similar decrease in soldiers. This decrease becomes even more evident when compared to the incidence in Israel during the 1950s and 1960s (Figure 2). That the incidence has remained similar over time among military personnel indicates that the pathogen and the vector continue to exist in Israel and that soldiers are at a high risk of contracting it because of their activities. Infection has occurred although Israel Defense Force commanders are aware of TBRF and all soldiers and commanders receive annual guidelines on preventing TBRF. Furthermore, entering caves is prohibited, and most TBRF cases in the military (67%) were not due to cave exposure. The declining incidence among civilians is likely due to a decrease in the rate of exposure with increased urbanization. A civilian subpopulation that continues to be at risk is schoolchildren; most cases occurred after field trips.

Bottom Line: We evaluated the epidemiology of relapsing fever from 1971 to 2003 in Israel.In civilians, incidence declined from 0.35 to 0.11 cases per 100,000 persons annually; in military personnel it averaged 6.4 cases per 100,000 persons annually.These data imply that the pathogen and vector continue to exist in Israel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the epidemiology of relapsing fever from 1971 to 2003 in Israel. In civilians, incidence declined from 0.35 to 0.11 cases per 100,000 persons annually; in military personnel it averaged 6.4 cases per 100,000 persons annually. These data imply that the pathogen and vector continue to exist in Israel.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus