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Phoenix and Fowl: Birds of a Feather

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A treasured aviary, the vast collection of bird paintings in Chinese art reflects longstanding global fascination with our feathered friends... Balanced on two legs, like humans, and able to fly and swim, birds have been viewed as an engineering miracle in the East and West and have been studied by artists and scientists alike... Traditional Chinese painting goes back 6,000 years to the Neolithic period and is found on early pottery decorated with brush images of humans and animals... The period saw suspension of artists' and intellectuals' rights and retreat to traditional styles of painting... Need for greater artistic expression coincided with the return of native rule during the Ming dynasty... The Ming dynasty (1368–1644) was a time of cultural restoration and expansion for the Chinese, a "scholar's culture" of thriving literary and artistic communities populated by writers, poets, and artists, many of them outstanding masters with extraordinary skills and breadth... Phoenix and Birds, on this month's cover, exhibits many of the qualities of Ming dynasty silk scroll painting... This legendary bird, part of global mythology, is described here in the Chinese tradition... Like the dragon, with which it is often associated, the phoenix, or fenghuang, exemplifies the union of yin and yang (polar opposites complementing each other in nature and underlying order within the universe)... In this harmonious bird scene, the unknown artist injects a measure of Confucian values, the need for each creature to act not singly but in connection with others, through five relationships: parent-child, husband-wife, sibling-sibling, friend-friend, ruler-subject, in networks of individual persons, the family, the state, the universe... The imperial phoenix with its patchwork beauty, perched high on the mount is not much different from the frolicking cranes or the humble fowl crouching anonymously in the foreground... All participate in nature's play... The circle is complete as new opportunities arise for recombination with local mammalian strains to form a new virus with pandemic potential... Confucian relationships meet nature's whim.

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Phoenix and Birds. China (c. 16th century). Ink and colors on silk (213.4 cm × 113 cm). Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, USA. Gift of Charles M. and Anna C. Cooke Trust Fund, 1928 (141.1)
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Fa: Phoenix and Birds. China (c. 16th century). Ink and colors on silk (213.4 cm × 113 cm). Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, USA. Gift of Charles M. and Anna C. Cooke Trust Fund, 1928 (141.1)


Phoenix and Fowl: Birds of a Feather
Phoenix and Birds. China (c. 16th century). Ink and colors on silk (213.4 cm × 113 cm). Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, USA. Gift of Charles M. and Anna C. Cooke Trust Fund, 1928 (141.1)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3367334&req=5

Fa: Phoenix and Birds. China (c. 16th century). Ink and colors on silk (213.4 cm × 113 cm). Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, USA. Gift of Charles M. and Anna C. Cooke Trust Fund, 1928 (141.1)

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

A treasured aviary, the vast collection of bird paintings in Chinese art reflects longstanding global fascination with our feathered friends... Balanced on two legs, like humans, and able to fly and swim, birds have been viewed as an engineering miracle in the East and West and have been studied by artists and scientists alike... Traditional Chinese painting goes back 6,000 years to the Neolithic period and is found on early pottery decorated with brush images of humans and animals... The period saw suspension of artists' and intellectuals' rights and retreat to traditional styles of painting... Need for greater artistic expression coincided with the return of native rule during the Ming dynasty... The Ming dynasty (1368–1644) was a time of cultural restoration and expansion for the Chinese, a "scholar's culture" of thriving literary and artistic communities populated by writers, poets, and artists, many of them outstanding masters with extraordinary skills and breadth... Phoenix and Birds, on this month's cover, exhibits many of the qualities of Ming dynasty silk scroll painting... This legendary bird, part of global mythology, is described here in the Chinese tradition... Like the dragon, with which it is often associated, the phoenix, or fenghuang, exemplifies the union of yin and yang (polar opposites complementing each other in nature and underlying order within the universe)... In this harmonious bird scene, the unknown artist injects a measure of Confucian values, the need for each creature to act not singly but in connection with others, through five relationships: parent-child, husband-wife, sibling-sibling, friend-friend, ruler-subject, in networks of individual persons, the family, the state, the universe... The imperial phoenix with its patchwork beauty, perched high on the mount is not much different from the frolicking cranes or the humble fowl crouching anonymously in the foreground... All participate in nature's play... The circle is complete as new opportunities arise for recombination with local mammalian strains to form a new virus with pandemic potential... Confucian relationships meet nature's whim.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus