Limits...
Accuracy, stability, and corrective behavior in a visuomotor tracking task: a preliminary study.

Ryu YU, Buchanan JJ - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern.The amount of corrective movements decreased as the stability of tracking performance increased for the 0°, 45°, and 135° patterns.The results demonstrate that corrective behaviors are an important motor process in maintaining the stability of stable perception-action coordination patterns, while offering little benefit for unstable perception-action patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan, South Korea. ryuyounguk@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Visuomotor tracking tasks have been used to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that allow for the coordination of a movement to an environmental event. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between accuracy and stability of tracking performance and the amount of corrective movements that emerge for various coordination patterns in a unimanual visuomotor tracking task. Participants (N = 6) produced rhythmic elbow flexion-extension motions and were required to track an external sinusoidal signal at five different relative phases, 0°, 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180°. Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern. Corrective movements were correlated with changes in accuracy only for the 0° relative phase pattern, with more corrections emerging for less accurate performance. The amount of corrective movements decreased as the stability of tracking performance increased for the 0°, 45°, and 135° patterns. For the 90° and 180° tracking patterns, the amount of corrective movements was not correlated with pattern accuracy or pattern stability. The results demonstrate that corrective behaviors are an important motor process in maintaining the stability of stable perception-action coordination patterns, while offering little benefit for unstable perception-action patterns.

Show MeSH
Mean absolute phase errors, TCV values, and percentages of main and high frequency components as a function of required target pattern.Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern (A and B). Differential intermittency among the five patterns was not found (D). The error bars represent the standard deviation of the between subject variability.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3366944&req=5

pone-0038537-g003: Mean absolute phase errors, TCV values, and percentages of main and high frequency components as a function of required target pattern.Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern (A and B). Differential intermittency among the five patterns was not found (D). The error bars represent the standard deviation of the between subject variability.

Mentions: A main effect of pattern was found in the φAE data (F(4,20) = 4.36, p<.05, ηp2 = .47) and post-hoc tests revealed that the 0° and 45° target patterns were produced with significantly less error than the other three patterns (Figure 3A). The analysis of the TCV values revealed a main effect of Pattern (F(4,20) = 6.93, p<.01, ηp2 = .69) and post-hoc tests showed that the 0° phase pattern more stable (largest TCV value) than the other four patterns and that the 135° phase pattern was less stable (lowest TCV value) than the other four patterns (Figure 3B), with no differences between 45°, 90° and 180° patterns. The power spectrum analysis showed that the primary peak was located at the target frequency (Mean  = 0.801 Hz, Std. Dev.  = 0.004) and that peak frequency was not significantly affected by visuomotor tracking pattern (p>0.5). No significant main effects or interactions were found in the analysis of the percentage of power in the main frequency component. This was expected because the required tracking frequency was the same regardless of the required tracking pattern. The analysis of the percentage of power in the high frequency component did not reveal a main effect of pattern (Figure 3D). This result does not satisfy the prediction of finding differential intermittency as a function of differences in tracking accuracy and stability.


Accuracy, stability, and corrective behavior in a visuomotor tracking task: a preliminary study.

Ryu YU, Buchanan JJ - PLoS ONE (2012)

Mean absolute phase errors, TCV values, and percentages of main and high frequency components as a function of required target pattern.Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern (A and B). Differential intermittency among the five patterns was not found (D). The error bars represent the standard deviation of the between subject variability.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3366944&req=5

pone-0038537-g003: Mean absolute phase errors, TCV values, and percentages of main and high frequency components as a function of required target pattern.Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern (A and B). Differential intermittency among the five patterns was not found (D). The error bars represent the standard deviation of the between subject variability.
Mentions: A main effect of pattern was found in the φAE data (F(4,20) = 4.36, p<.05, ηp2 = .47) and post-hoc tests revealed that the 0° and 45° target patterns were produced with significantly less error than the other three patterns (Figure 3A). The analysis of the TCV values revealed a main effect of Pattern (F(4,20) = 6.93, p<.01, ηp2 = .69) and post-hoc tests showed that the 0° phase pattern more stable (largest TCV value) than the other four patterns and that the 135° phase pattern was less stable (lowest TCV value) than the other four patterns (Figure 3B), with no differences between 45°, 90° and 180° patterns. The power spectrum analysis showed that the primary peak was located at the target frequency (Mean  = 0.801 Hz, Std. Dev.  = 0.004) and that peak frequency was not significantly affected by visuomotor tracking pattern (p>0.5). No significant main effects or interactions were found in the analysis of the percentage of power in the main frequency component. This was expected because the required tracking frequency was the same regardless of the required tracking pattern. The analysis of the percentage of power in the high frequency component did not reveal a main effect of pattern (Figure 3D). This result does not satisfy the prediction of finding differential intermittency as a function of differences in tracking accuracy and stability.

Bottom Line: Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern.The amount of corrective movements decreased as the stability of tracking performance increased for the 0°, 45°, and 135° patterns.The results demonstrate that corrective behaviors are an important motor process in maintaining the stability of stable perception-action coordination patterns, while offering little benefit for unstable perception-action patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan, South Korea. ryuyounguk@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Visuomotor tracking tasks have been used to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that allow for the coordination of a movement to an environmental event. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between accuracy and stability of tracking performance and the amount of corrective movements that emerge for various coordination patterns in a unimanual visuomotor tracking task. Participants (N = 6) produced rhythmic elbow flexion-extension motions and were required to track an external sinusoidal signal at five different relative phases, 0°, 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180°. Differential accuracy and stability were found among the five tracking patterns with the 0° relative phase pattern being the most accurate and stable pattern. Corrective movements were correlated with changes in accuracy only for the 0° relative phase pattern, with more corrections emerging for less accurate performance. The amount of corrective movements decreased as the stability of tracking performance increased for the 0°, 45°, and 135° patterns. For the 90° and 180° tracking patterns, the amount of corrective movements was not correlated with pattern accuracy or pattern stability. The results demonstrate that corrective behaviors are an important motor process in maintaining the stability of stable perception-action coordination patterns, while offering little benefit for unstable perception-action patterns.

Show MeSH