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Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

Patten TM, Rennie CJ, Robinson PA, Gong P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated.Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity.The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

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Distribution of alpha waves between the two directions (frontal-to-occipital direction and occipital-to-frontal direction) before and after stimulus onset.The blue bars indicate the prestimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval before stimulus onset and the red bars indicate the poststimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval after stimulus onset.
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pone-0038392-g006: Distribution of alpha waves between the two directions (frontal-to-occipital direction and occipital-to-frontal direction) before and after stimulus onset.The blue bars indicate the prestimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval before stimulus onset and the red bars indicate the poststimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval after stimulus onset.

Mentions: First, the direction of traveling waves was investigated. Figure 6 shows the percentage of alpha waves in each direction, which was calculated by averaging and (see Methods) across trials and subjects. Similarly, the distribution of waves during post-stimulus 500 epochs was calculated. As shown in the figure, during the 500 ms time interval before the stimulus onset, the frontal-to-occipital and occipital-to-frontal propagation directions of the spontaneous waves were roughly evenly divided at 50.3±2.2% and 49.7±1.8%, and there was no significant difference between them (permutation test, p>0.05). However, after the stimulus onset the occipital-to-frontal waves became more common (56.0±1.9% compared with the frontal-to-occipital direction at 44.0±2.0%). The change in the propagation direction was significant (p<0.005), based on the permutation test (see Methods). This indicates that the external stimuli evoke more waves traveling in the O-to-F direction than the F-to-O direction.


Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

Patten TM, Rennie CJ, Robinson PA, Gong P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Distribution of alpha waves between the two directions (frontal-to-occipital direction and occipital-to-frontal direction) before and after stimulus onset.The blue bars indicate the prestimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval before stimulus onset and the red bars indicate the poststimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval after stimulus onset.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3366935&req=5

pone-0038392-g006: Distribution of alpha waves between the two directions (frontal-to-occipital direction and occipital-to-frontal direction) before and after stimulus onset.The blue bars indicate the prestimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval before stimulus onset and the red bars indicate the poststimulus waves measured in the 500 ms interval after stimulus onset.
Mentions: First, the direction of traveling waves was investigated. Figure 6 shows the percentage of alpha waves in each direction, which was calculated by averaging and (see Methods) across trials and subjects. Similarly, the distribution of waves during post-stimulus 500 epochs was calculated. As shown in the figure, during the 500 ms time interval before the stimulus onset, the frontal-to-occipital and occipital-to-frontal propagation directions of the spontaneous waves were roughly evenly divided at 50.3±2.2% and 49.7±1.8%, and there was no significant difference between them (permutation test, p>0.05). However, after the stimulus onset the occipital-to-frontal waves became more common (56.0±1.9% compared with the frontal-to-occipital direction at 44.0±2.0%). The change in the propagation direction was significant (p<0.005), based on the permutation test (see Methods). This indicates that the external stimuli evoke more waves traveling in the O-to-F direction than the F-to-O direction.

Bottom Line: The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated.Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity.The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

Show MeSH