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Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

Patten TM, Rennie CJ, Robinson PA, Gong P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated.Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity.The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

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Schematic view of the electrodes placed in accordance with the 10–20 International Systems showing the 26 electrodes.The three chains approximately parallel to the midline are the chains along which we did our traveling wave analysis.
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pone-0038392-g001: Schematic view of the electrodes placed in accordance with the 10–20 International Systems showing the 26 electrodes.The three chains approximately parallel to the midline are the chains along which we did our traveling wave analysis.

Mentions: Data collection was done by Brain Resource Ltd (Ultimo, NSW, Australia; www.brainresource.com) and results were made available through the Brain Resource International Database (BRID). Recordings were made at 26 electrode sites from an extension to the International 10–20 System, following previously published methods for acquisition and artifact removal [27]. The layout of the electrodes is shown in Fig. 1. EEG data were recorded at a 500 Hz sampling rate and an A/D precision of 0.06 µV through a NuAmps (Neuroscan) amplifier using an averaged mastoid reference and low-pass third order Butterworth filter with a −6 dB point at 50 Hz. Note that while the main results obtained here were based on the averaged mastoid reference, we have also compared with an average reference, which was obtained by calculating the spatial average of EEG signals at each time moment and subtracting it from all channels, to verify that the results obtained here don't sensitively depend on the reference channel.


Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

Patten TM, Rennie CJ, Robinson PA, Gong P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Schematic view of the electrodes placed in accordance with the 10–20 International Systems showing the 26 electrodes.The three chains approximately parallel to the midline are the chains along which we did our traveling wave analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3366935&req=5

pone-0038392-g001: Schematic view of the electrodes placed in accordance with the 10–20 International Systems showing the 26 electrodes.The three chains approximately parallel to the midline are the chains along which we did our traveling wave analysis.
Mentions: Data collection was done by Brain Resource Ltd (Ultimo, NSW, Australia; www.brainresource.com) and results were made available through the Brain Resource International Database (BRID). Recordings were made at 26 electrode sites from an extension to the International 10–20 System, following previously published methods for acquisition and artifact removal [27]. The layout of the electrodes is shown in Fig. 1. EEG data were recorded at a 500 Hz sampling rate and an A/D precision of 0.06 µV through a NuAmps (Neuroscan) amplifier using an averaged mastoid reference and low-pass third order Butterworth filter with a −6 dB point at 50 Hz. Note that while the main results obtained here were based on the averaged mastoid reference, we have also compared with an average reference, which was obtained by calculating the spatial average of EEG signals at each time moment and subtracting it from all channels, to verify that the results obtained here don't sensitively depend on the reference channel.

Bottom Line: The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated.Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity.The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

Show MeSH