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An increased fluid intake leads to feet swelling in 100-km ultra-marathoners - an observational field study.

Cejka C, Knechtle B, Knechtle P, Rüst CA, Rosemann T - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2012)

Bottom Line: Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (2.4%) (p < 0.0001); plasma [Na+] increased by 1.2% (p < 0.0001).Haematocrit decreased (p = 0.0005).An increase in feet volume after a 100-km ultra-marathon was due to an increased fluid intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. beat.knechtle@hispeed.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: An association between fluid intake and changes in volumes of the upper and lower limb has been described in 100-km ultra-marathoners. The purpose of the present study was (i) to investigate the association between fluid intake and a potential development of peripheral oedemas leading to an increase of the feet volume in 100-km ultra-marathoners and (ii) to evaluate a possible association between the changes in plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]) and changes in feet volume.

Methods: In seventy-six 100-km ultra-marathoners, body mass, plasma [Na+], haematocrit and urine specific gravity were determined pre- and post-race. Fluid intake and the changes of volume of the feet were measured where the changes of volume of the feet were estimated using plethysmography.

Results: Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (2.4%) (p < 0.0001); plasma [Na+] increased by 1.2% (p < 0.0001). Haematocrit decreased (p = 0.0005). The volume of the feet remained unchanged (p > 0.05). Plasma volume and urine specific gravity increased (p < 0.0001). Fluid intake was positively related to the change in the volume of the feet (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001) and negatively to post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0142). Running speed was negatively related to both fluid intake (r = -0.33, p = 0.0036) and the change in feet volume (r = -0.23, p = 0.0236). The change in the volume of the feet was negatively related to the change in plasma [Na+] (r = -0.26, p = 0.0227). The change in body mass was negatively related to both post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0129) and running speed (r = -0.34, p = 0.0028).

Conclusions: An increase in feet volume after a 100-km ultra-marathon was due to an increased fluid intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the right foot (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001).
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Figure 8: Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the right foot (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001).

Mentions: Running speed was significantly and negatively related to the change in the foot volume, whereas the volume of the foot tended to decrease in faster runners (Figure 7). Although the volumes of the foot showed no changes during the race, total fluid intake during the race was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the foot (Figure 8). The change in the volume of the foot was significantly and negatively related to the change in plasma [Na+] (Figure 9).


An increased fluid intake leads to feet swelling in 100-km ultra-marathoners - an observational field study.

Cejka C, Knechtle B, Knechtle P, Rüst CA, Rosemann T - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2012)

Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the right foot (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3366912&req=5

Figure 8: Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the right foot (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001).
Mentions: Running speed was significantly and negatively related to the change in the foot volume, whereas the volume of the foot tended to decrease in faster runners (Figure 7). Although the volumes of the foot showed no changes during the race, total fluid intake during the race was significantly and positively related to the change in the volume of the foot (Figure 8). The change in the volume of the foot was significantly and negatively related to the change in plasma [Na+] (Figure 9).

Bottom Line: Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (2.4%) (p < 0.0001); plasma [Na+] increased by 1.2% (p < 0.0001).Haematocrit decreased (p = 0.0005).An increase in feet volume after a 100-km ultra-marathon was due to an increased fluid intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. beat.knechtle@hispeed.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: An association between fluid intake and changes in volumes of the upper and lower limb has been described in 100-km ultra-marathoners. The purpose of the present study was (i) to investigate the association between fluid intake and a potential development of peripheral oedemas leading to an increase of the feet volume in 100-km ultra-marathoners and (ii) to evaluate a possible association between the changes in plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]) and changes in feet volume.

Methods: In seventy-six 100-km ultra-marathoners, body mass, plasma [Na+], haematocrit and urine specific gravity were determined pre- and post-race. Fluid intake and the changes of volume of the feet were measured where the changes of volume of the feet were estimated using plethysmography.

Results: Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (2.4%) (p < 0.0001); plasma [Na+] increased by 1.2% (p < 0.0001). Haematocrit decreased (p = 0.0005). The volume of the feet remained unchanged (p > 0.05). Plasma volume and urine specific gravity increased (p < 0.0001). Fluid intake was positively related to the change in the volume of the feet (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001) and negatively to post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0142). Running speed was negatively related to both fluid intake (r = -0.33, p = 0.0036) and the change in feet volume (r = -0.23, p = 0.0236). The change in the volume of the feet was negatively related to the change in plasma [Na+] (r = -0.26, p = 0.0227). The change in body mass was negatively related to both post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0129) and running speed (r = -0.34, p = 0.0028).

Conclusions: An increase in feet volume after a 100-km ultra-marathon was due to an increased fluid intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus