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Maternal zinc supplementation improves spatial memory in rat pups.

Piechal A, Blecharz-Klin K, Pyrzanowska J, Widy-Tyszkiewicz E - Biol Trace Elem Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Behavioural effects of maternal supplementation with ZnSO(4) were analysed in rat pups with the Morris water task performance, a hole board and a T-maze.Follow-up data on brain content of zinc in the hippocampus revealed significant differences between the groups and in supplemented groups correlated with crossings above the original platform position.These findings suggest that pre- and postnatal zinc supplementation may improve cognitive development in rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. piechal@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
A large body of evidence supports an opinion that adequate dietary zinc is essential for prenatal and postnatal brain development. Behavioural effects of maternal supplementation with ZnSO(4) were analysed in rat pups with the Morris water task performance, a hole board and a T-maze. Wistar females during pregnancy and lactation received a drinking water solution of ZnSO(4) at doses of 16 mg/kg (group Zn16) or 32 mg/kg (group Zn32). Behavioural tests were conducted on the 4-week-old male rat pups. Zinc concentration in the serum, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of offsprings was determined by means of atomic absorption techniques. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test revealed an increase of climbing in the Zn16 group in comparison to the control group (Con) and the Zn32 group during the hole board test. ANOVA for repeated measures showed a significant memory improvement in both supplemented groups compared to the control in the probe trial on day 5 of the water maze test. ZnSO(4) treatment significantly elevated zinc levels in the rat serum. Follow-up data on brain content of zinc in the hippocampus revealed significant differences between the groups and in supplemented groups correlated with crossings above the original platform position. These findings suggest that pre- and postnatal zinc supplementation may improve cognitive development in rats.

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Escape latency (±S.E.) during acquisition of the spatial navigation task (16 trials) for the control (n = 10) and rats pre- and postnatally supplemented with ZnSO4 (Zn16, n = 8; Zn32, n = 8)
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Fig2: Escape latency (±S.E.) during acquisition of the spatial navigation task (16 trials) for the control (n = 10) and rats pre- and postnatally supplemented with ZnSO4 (Zn16, n = 8; Zn32, n = 8)

Mentions: The latency to find the hidden platform for all experimental groups is presented in Fig. 2. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences between groups in the acquisition of water maze (F(2,23) = 24.5, p < 0.001). A significant treatment × day interaction: F(6,69) = 2.88, p < 0.05 and for treatment × trials: F(18,207) = 3.64, p < 0.01 was found. The mean escape latency over 4 days for the control group (44.8 ± 1.6 s) and Zn32 (34.1 ± 2.4 s) was significantly greater that the Zn16 group (26.2 ± 1.6 s) (Newman–Keuls test, p < 0.01).Fig. 2


Maternal zinc supplementation improves spatial memory in rat pups.

Piechal A, Blecharz-Klin K, Pyrzanowska J, Widy-Tyszkiewicz E - Biol Trace Elem Res (2012)

Escape latency (±S.E.) during acquisition of the spatial navigation task (16 trials) for the control (n = 10) and rats pre- and postnatally supplemented with ZnSO4 (Zn16, n = 8; Zn32, n = 8)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362702&req=5

Fig2: Escape latency (±S.E.) during acquisition of the spatial navigation task (16 trials) for the control (n = 10) and rats pre- and postnatally supplemented with ZnSO4 (Zn16, n = 8; Zn32, n = 8)
Mentions: The latency to find the hidden platform for all experimental groups is presented in Fig. 2. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences between groups in the acquisition of water maze (F(2,23) = 24.5, p < 0.001). A significant treatment × day interaction: F(6,69) = 2.88, p < 0.05 and for treatment × trials: F(18,207) = 3.64, p < 0.01 was found. The mean escape latency over 4 days for the control group (44.8 ± 1.6 s) and Zn32 (34.1 ± 2.4 s) was significantly greater that the Zn16 group (26.2 ± 1.6 s) (Newman–Keuls test, p < 0.01).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Behavioural effects of maternal supplementation with ZnSO(4) were analysed in rat pups with the Morris water task performance, a hole board and a T-maze.Follow-up data on brain content of zinc in the hippocampus revealed significant differences between the groups and in supplemented groups correlated with crossings above the original platform position.These findings suggest that pre- and postnatal zinc supplementation may improve cognitive development in rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. piechal@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
A large body of evidence supports an opinion that adequate dietary zinc is essential for prenatal and postnatal brain development. Behavioural effects of maternal supplementation with ZnSO(4) were analysed in rat pups with the Morris water task performance, a hole board and a T-maze. Wistar females during pregnancy and lactation received a drinking water solution of ZnSO(4) at doses of 16 mg/kg (group Zn16) or 32 mg/kg (group Zn32). Behavioural tests were conducted on the 4-week-old male rat pups. Zinc concentration in the serum, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of offsprings was determined by means of atomic absorption techniques. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test revealed an increase of climbing in the Zn16 group in comparison to the control group (Con) and the Zn32 group during the hole board test. ANOVA for repeated measures showed a significant memory improvement in both supplemented groups compared to the control in the probe trial on day 5 of the water maze test. ZnSO(4) treatment significantly elevated zinc levels in the rat serum. Follow-up data on brain content of zinc in the hippocampus revealed significant differences between the groups and in supplemented groups correlated with crossings above the original platform position. These findings suggest that pre- and postnatal zinc supplementation may improve cognitive development in rats.

Show MeSH