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Improving access to mental health care and psychosocial support within a fragile context: a case study from Afghanistan.

Ventevogel P, van de Put W, Faiz H, van Mierlo B, Siddiqi M, Komproe IH - PLoS Med. (2012)

Bottom Line: As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Peter Ventevogel and colleagues provide a case study of their efforts to integrate brief, practice-oriented mental health training into the Afghanistan health care system at a time when the system was being rebuilt from scratch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research and Development, HealthNet TPO, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. peter@peterventevogel.com

ABSTRACT
As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Peter Ventevogel and colleagues provide a case study of their efforts to integrate brief, practice-oriented mental health training into the Afghanistan health care system at a time when the system was being rebuilt from scratch.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual consultations for CMDs, SMDs, and epilepsy and their percentage of all health consultations in the Shinwar cluster (2002–2011).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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pmed-1001225-g001: Annual consultations for CMDs, SMDs, and epilepsy and their percentage of all health consultations in the Shinwar cluster (2002–2011).

Mentions: Since 2002, the number of consultations for mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders has increased. Figure 1 presents longitudinal data of diagnoses for common mental disorders (CMDs), severe mental disorders (SMDs), epilepsy, and other MNS disorders in patients in the primary health care facilities of the Shinwar cluster. The absolute number of consultations for MNS disorders increased from 659 in 2002 (before the programme started) to well over 3,000 by the end of the development phase (2004). During the scale-up phase, which began at the end of 2005, the numbers of consultations for MNS disorders increased significantly, to over 20,000. During the maintenance phase (from 2009 onwards), the number of consultations for MNS disorders remained stable, but the percentage of such consultations of all health consultations decreased because of contextual changes in the overall health care system, such as concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of reproductive and child health services. From 2008 on, the basic health care system was strongly strengthened, leading to an increase in overall numbers of consultations. Among people newly diagnosed with an MNS disorder, most were diagnosed with CMD (83.2%), followed by epilepsy (8.9%) and SMD (2.7%). The category “other MNS disorders” (including severe learning disabilities and opium addiction) constituted 5.2% of the total new MNS disorders. Persons diagnosed with CMD had, on average, 2.0 annual visits, while those with chronic conditions had a higher number of annual visits: 3.9 and 3.3 for SMD and epilepsy, respectively. Of those patients diagnosed with CMD, 71.1% were female, for SMD the percentage of females was 43.3%, and for epilepsy, 51.8%.


Improving access to mental health care and psychosocial support within a fragile context: a case study from Afghanistan.

Ventevogel P, van de Put W, Faiz H, van Mierlo B, Siddiqi M, Komproe IH - PLoS Med. (2012)

Annual consultations for CMDs, SMDs, and epilepsy and their percentage of all health consultations in the Shinwar cluster (2002–2011).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362640&req=5

pmed-1001225-g001: Annual consultations for CMDs, SMDs, and epilepsy and their percentage of all health consultations in the Shinwar cluster (2002–2011).
Mentions: Since 2002, the number of consultations for mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders has increased. Figure 1 presents longitudinal data of diagnoses for common mental disorders (CMDs), severe mental disorders (SMDs), epilepsy, and other MNS disorders in patients in the primary health care facilities of the Shinwar cluster. The absolute number of consultations for MNS disorders increased from 659 in 2002 (before the programme started) to well over 3,000 by the end of the development phase (2004). During the scale-up phase, which began at the end of 2005, the numbers of consultations for MNS disorders increased significantly, to over 20,000. During the maintenance phase (from 2009 onwards), the number of consultations for MNS disorders remained stable, but the percentage of such consultations of all health consultations decreased because of contextual changes in the overall health care system, such as concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of reproductive and child health services. From 2008 on, the basic health care system was strongly strengthened, leading to an increase in overall numbers of consultations. Among people newly diagnosed with an MNS disorder, most were diagnosed with CMD (83.2%), followed by epilepsy (8.9%) and SMD (2.7%). The category “other MNS disorders” (including severe learning disabilities and opium addiction) constituted 5.2% of the total new MNS disorders. Persons diagnosed with CMD had, on average, 2.0 annual visits, while those with chronic conditions had a higher number of annual visits: 3.9 and 3.3 for SMD and epilepsy, respectively. Of those patients diagnosed with CMD, 71.1% were female, for SMD the percentage of females was 43.3%, and for epilepsy, 51.8%.

Bottom Line: As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Peter Ventevogel and colleagues provide a case study of their efforts to integrate brief, practice-oriented mental health training into the Afghanistan health care system at a time when the system was being rebuilt from scratch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research and Development, HealthNet TPO, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. peter@peterventevogel.com

ABSTRACT
As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Peter Ventevogel and colleagues provide a case study of their efforts to integrate brief, practice-oriented mental health training into the Afghanistan health care system at a time when the system was being rebuilt from scratch.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus