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Mitochondrial Genetic Differentiation of Spirlin (Actinopterigii: Cyprinidae) in the South Caspian Sea basin of Iran.

Seifali M, Arshad A, Moghaddam FY, Esmaeili HR, Kiabi BH, Daud SK, Aliabadian M - Evol. Bioinform. Online (2012)

Bottom Line: Knowledge about Alburnoides remains lacking relative to many other species, resulting in a lack of a systematic position and taxonomic diagnosis.The western populations (clade I) may be considered as Alburnoides eichwaldii, whereas the Talar river populations (clade II) are represented as Alburnoides sp.1 and the eastern populations (clade III) may be distinct taxa of Alburnoides sp.2.This molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that A. bipunctatus does not exist in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran, and that the western and eastern populations are distinct taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Alzahra, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Knowledge about Alburnoides remains lacking relative to many other species, resulting in a lack of a systematic position and taxonomic diagnosis. Basic biological information for Alburnoides has been constructed, and it is necessary to understand further and obtain more information about this species. Its phylogenetic relationships are still debated and no molecular data have been used to study this taxon in Iran. A holistic approach for genetic methods was adopted to analyze possible spirlin population differences at selected centers in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran.

Methods: The phylogenetic relationships were determined based on 774 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 32 specimens of spirlin from nine locations in the south Caspian Sea drainage basin of Iran. The nucleotide sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods.

Results: The mitochondrial gene tree largely supports the existence of three major clades. The western populations (clade I) may be considered as Alburnoides eichwaldii, whereas the Talar river populations (clade II) are represented as Alburnoides sp.1 and the eastern populations (clade III) may be distinct taxa of Alburnoides sp.2.

Conclusion: This molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that A. bipunctatus does not exist in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran, and that the western and eastern populations are distinct taxa.

No MeSH data available.


Bayesian consensus tree resulting from analysis of 774 base pairs of cytochrome b data in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran only.Notes: Values at branches indicate, in sequence, posterior probability, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap (all >0.50/50%). *Posterior probability or bootstrap value of 1.00/100%.Abbreviations: Sd, Safarud; Zl, Zeleki; Do, Dorudkhan; Cr, Chenarrudkhan; Vt, Valamrud; Tu, Tuji; Ks, Kesselian; Gz, Gorganrud; Mp, Madarsoo.
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f2-ebo-8-2012-219: Bayesian consensus tree resulting from analysis of 774 base pairs of cytochrome b data in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran only.Notes: Values at branches indicate, in sequence, posterior probability, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap (all >0.50/50%). *Posterior probability or bootstrap value of 1.00/100%.Abbreviations: Sd, Safarud; Zl, Zeleki; Do, Dorudkhan; Cr, Chenarrudkhan; Vt, Valamrud; Tu, Tuji; Ks, Kesselian; Gz, Gorganrud; Mp, Madarsoo.

Mentions: The neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses produced a tree topology similar to maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results of the three character state methods, ie, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses, represent the three major clades, namely, clade I, clade II, and clade III, with strong posterior probability support in Bayesian analysis, bootstrap values in maximum likelihood, and bootstrap values in maximum parsimony; therefore, for economy of space, only the resulting Bayesian trees are presented (Fig. 2). Clade I included five populations from Safarud, Zeleki, Dorudkhan, Chenarrudkhan, and Valamrud, with values of 100/100/99 posterior probability for Bayesian analyses, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap, respectively. They mostly belong to the western (Sefidrud) drainage region of the south Caspian Sea basin. Clade II (Tuji and Kesselian) represented populations with values of 100/84/98 in the central (Talar) drainage region of the south Caspian Sea basin. Populations including Gorganrud and Madarsoo in the southeastern Caspian Sea (Gorganrud drainage basin) make the distinct clade III, with 100 bootstrap values using all methods. There was a sister-group relationship between Kesselian and Tuji (PP = 100/84/98) in clade II and a sister-group relationship between Madarsoo and Gorganrud (PP = 100/100/100) in clade III (Fig. 2).


Mitochondrial Genetic Differentiation of Spirlin (Actinopterigii: Cyprinidae) in the South Caspian Sea basin of Iran.

Seifali M, Arshad A, Moghaddam FY, Esmaeili HR, Kiabi BH, Daud SK, Aliabadian M - Evol. Bioinform. Online (2012)

Bayesian consensus tree resulting from analysis of 774 base pairs of cytochrome b data in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran only.Notes: Values at branches indicate, in sequence, posterior probability, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap (all >0.50/50%). *Posterior probability or bootstrap value of 1.00/100%.Abbreviations: Sd, Safarud; Zl, Zeleki; Do, Dorudkhan; Cr, Chenarrudkhan; Vt, Valamrud; Tu, Tuji; Ks, Kesselian; Gz, Gorganrud; Mp, Madarsoo.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362333&req=5

f2-ebo-8-2012-219: Bayesian consensus tree resulting from analysis of 774 base pairs of cytochrome b data in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran only.Notes: Values at branches indicate, in sequence, posterior probability, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap (all >0.50/50%). *Posterior probability or bootstrap value of 1.00/100%.Abbreviations: Sd, Safarud; Zl, Zeleki; Do, Dorudkhan; Cr, Chenarrudkhan; Vt, Valamrud; Tu, Tuji; Ks, Kesselian; Gz, Gorganrud; Mp, Madarsoo.
Mentions: The neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses produced a tree topology similar to maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results of the three character state methods, ie, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses, represent the three major clades, namely, clade I, clade II, and clade III, with strong posterior probability support in Bayesian analysis, bootstrap values in maximum likelihood, and bootstrap values in maximum parsimony; therefore, for economy of space, only the resulting Bayesian trees are presented (Fig. 2). Clade I included five populations from Safarud, Zeleki, Dorudkhan, Chenarrudkhan, and Valamrud, with values of 100/100/99 posterior probability for Bayesian analyses, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony bootstrap, respectively. They mostly belong to the western (Sefidrud) drainage region of the south Caspian Sea basin. Clade II (Tuji and Kesselian) represented populations with values of 100/84/98 in the central (Talar) drainage region of the south Caspian Sea basin. Populations including Gorganrud and Madarsoo in the southeastern Caspian Sea (Gorganrud drainage basin) make the distinct clade III, with 100 bootstrap values using all methods. There was a sister-group relationship between Kesselian and Tuji (PP = 100/84/98) in clade II and a sister-group relationship between Madarsoo and Gorganrud (PP = 100/100/100) in clade III (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Knowledge about Alburnoides remains lacking relative to many other species, resulting in a lack of a systematic position and taxonomic diagnosis.The western populations (clade I) may be considered as Alburnoides eichwaldii, whereas the Talar river populations (clade II) are represented as Alburnoides sp.1 and the eastern populations (clade III) may be distinct taxa of Alburnoides sp.2.This molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that A. bipunctatus does not exist in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran, and that the western and eastern populations are distinct taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Alzahra, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Knowledge about Alburnoides remains lacking relative to many other species, resulting in a lack of a systematic position and taxonomic diagnosis. Basic biological information for Alburnoides has been constructed, and it is necessary to understand further and obtain more information about this species. Its phylogenetic relationships are still debated and no molecular data have been used to study this taxon in Iran. A holistic approach for genetic methods was adopted to analyze possible spirlin population differences at selected centers in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran.

Methods: The phylogenetic relationships were determined based on 774 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 32 specimens of spirlin from nine locations in the south Caspian Sea drainage basin of Iran. The nucleotide sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods.

Results: The mitochondrial gene tree largely supports the existence of three major clades. The western populations (clade I) may be considered as Alburnoides eichwaldii, whereas the Talar river populations (clade II) are represented as Alburnoides sp.1 and the eastern populations (clade III) may be distinct taxa of Alburnoides sp.2.

Conclusion: This molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that A. bipunctatus does not exist in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran, and that the western and eastern populations are distinct taxa.

No MeSH data available.