Limits...
Endoscopic-ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and the role of the cytopathologist in solid pancreatic lesion diagnosis.

Iqbal S, Friedel D, Gupta M, Ogden L, Stavropoulos SN - Patholog Res Int (2012)

Bottom Line: The final diagnosis is based upon the correlation of clinical, EUS, and cytologic features.A close interaction with the cytopathologist is required in improving the diagnostic yield.Day to day examples of different solid pancreatic lesions have been presented at the end.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Winthrop-University Hospital, Mineola, NY 1150, USA.

ABSTRACT
Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is the most sensitive imaging modality for solid pancreatic lesions. The specificity, however, is low (about 75%). It can be increased to 100% with an accuracy of 95% by the addition of fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Cytopathology plays an important role. The final diagnosis is based upon the correlation of clinical, EUS, and cytologic features. A close interaction with the cytopathologist is required in improving the diagnostic yield. In this paper, we present an overview of the role of EUS-guided FNA and importance of close interaction with the cytopathologist. Day to day examples of different solid pancreatic lesions have been presented at the end.

No MeSH data available.


Linear echoendoscope. The tip scans parallel to its longitudinal axis. An FNA needle is seen coming out of the scope channel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362237&req=5

fig2: Linear echoendoscope. The tip scans parallel to its longitudinal axis. An FNA needle is seen coming out of the scope channel.

Mentions: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was first introduced by Dr. Eugene DiMagno in the 1980s by combining a high-frequency ultrasound transducer to an endoscope [1]. Initial echoendoscopes were radial, which scan perpendicular to scope's axis and provide 360-degree images similar to computerized tomography (CT) (Figure 1). In 1991, convex linear-array echoendoscope was introduced by Pentax (FG-32). These linear scopes scan parallel to the longitudinal axis of the scope and enable fine needle aspiration (FNA) and different therapeutic applications (Figure 2).


Endoscopic-ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and the role of the cytopathologist in solid pancreatic lesion diagnosis.

Iqbal S, Friedel D, Gupta M, Ogden L, Stavropoulos SN - Patholog Res Int (2012)

Linear echoendoscope. The tip scans parallel to its longitudinal axis. An FNA needle is seen coming out of the scope channel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362237&req=5

fig2: Linear echoendoscope. The tip scans parallel to its longitudinal axis. An FNA needle is seen coming out of the scope channel.
Mentions: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was first introduced by Dr. Eugene DiMagno in the 1980s by combining a high-frequency ultrasound transducer to an endoscope [1]. Initial echoendoscopes were radial, which scan perpendicular to scope's axis and provide 360-degree images similar to computerized tomography (CT) (Figure 1). In 1991, convex linear-array echoendoscope was introduced by Pentax (FG-32). These linear scopes scan parallel to the longitudinal axis of the scope and enable fine needle aspiration (FNA) and different therapeutic applications (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The final diagnosis is based upon the correlation of clinical, EUS, and cytologic features.A close interaction with the cytopathologist is required in improving the diagnostic yield.Day to day examples of different solid pancreatic lesions have been presented at the end.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Winthrop-University Hospital, Mineola, NY 1150, USA.

ABSTRACT
Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is the most sensitive imaging modality for solid pancreatic lesions. The specificity, however, is low (about 75%). It can be increased to 100% with an accuracy of 95% by the addition of fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Cytopathology plays an important role. The final diagnosis is based upon the correlation of clinical, EUS, and cytologic features. A close interaction with the cytopathologist is required in improving the diagnostic yield. In this paper, we present an overview of the role of EUS-guided FNA and importance of close interaction with the cytopathologist. Day to day examples of different solid pancreatic lesions have been presented at the end.

No MeSH data available.