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Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

Ebong SM, Eyangoh S, Marion E, Landier J, Marsollier L, Guégan JF, Legall P - J Trop Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease.However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented.Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Mycobactériologie, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Cameroun-Réseau International des Institut Pasteur, BP 1274 Yaoundé, Cameroon.

ABSTRACT
Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Distribution of Hemiptera captured in the night by light traps; (b) distribution of Hemiptera collected directly in the water bodies by square-net.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: (a) Distribution of Hemiptera captured in the night by light traps; (b) distribution of Hemiptera collected directly in the water bodies by square-net.

Mentions: Light trap indirect collection yielded 390 specimens belonging only to 2 families; Belostomatidae represented 80.51% and Notonectidae 19.48% (Figure 2(b)). During the full moon, only the Notonectidae family come to light; Belostomatidae were absent at this phase of the, but they appeared a few nights after (Figure 2(b)). Belostomatidae family was very abundant mainly during the few nights that precede or follow the full moon, showing several peaks, which decreased progressively for rescinding at a few nights before full moon. Whatever the site of collection, the numerical variations of water bugs captured by light trap were almost consistent with Belostomatidae being prominent, that is, 33.33% of Belostomatidae and 5.12% of Notonectidae in the forest; 25.64% of Belostomatidae and 11.94% of Notonectidae in the savanna; 21.53% of Belostomatidae and 2.56% of Notonectidae near habitations (Figure 3(a)).


Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

Ebong SM, Eyangoh S, Marion E, Landier J, Marsollier L, Guégan JF, Legall P - J Trop Med (2012)

(a) Distribution of Hemiptera captured in the night by light traps; (b) distribution of Hemiptera collected directly in the water bodies by square-net.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362212&req=5

fig3: (a) Distribution of Hemiptera captured in the night by light traps; (b) distribution of Hemiptera collected directly in the water bodies by square-net.
Mentions: Light trap indirect collection yielded 390 specimens belonging only to 2 families; Belostomatidae represented 80.51% and Notonectidae 19.48% (Figure 2(b)). During the full moon, only the Notonectidae family come to light; Belostomatidae were absent at this phase of the, but they appeared a few nights after (Figure 2(b)). Belostomatidae family was very abundant mainly during the few nights that precede or follow the full moon, showing several peaks, which decreased progressively for rescinding at a few nights before full moon. Whatever the site of collection, the numerical variations of water bugs captured by light trap were almost consistent with Belostomatidae being prominent, that is, 33.33% of Belostomatidae and 5.12% of Notonectidae in the forest; 25.64% of Belostomatidae and 11.94% of Notonectidae in the savanna; 21.53% of Belostomatidae and 2.56% of Notonectidae near habitations (Figure 3(a)).

Bottom Line: Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease.However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented.Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Mycobactériologie, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Cameroun-Réseau International des Institut Pasteur, BP 1274 Yaoundé, Cameroon.

ABSTRACT
Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus