Limits...
The acute and residual effect of a single exercise session on meal glucose tolerance in sedentary young adults.

Short KR, Pratt LV, Teague AM - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Bottom Line: The study goals were to (1) establish the variability in postprandial glucose control in healthy young people consuming a mixed meal and, then (2) determine the acute and residual impact of a single exercise bout on postprandial glucose control.There were strong test-retest correlations for the post-meal area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, and Cpeptide (r = 0.73-0.83) and the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI, r = 0.76), and between meal and IVGTT-derived ISI (r = 0.83).Thus, a single moderate intensity exercise session can acutely improve glycemic control but the effect is modest and short-lived.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 1200 Children's Ave, Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The study goals were to (1) establish the variability in postprandial glucose control in healthy young people consuming a mixed meal and, then (2) determine the acute and residual impact of a single exercise bout on postprandial glucose control. In study 1, 18 people completed two similar mixed meal trials and an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). There were strong test-retest correlations for the post-meal area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, and Cpeptide (r = 0.73-0.83) and the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI, r = 0.76), and between meal and IVGTT-derived ISI (r = 0.83). In study 2, 11 untrained young adults completed 3 trials. One trial (No Ex) was completed after refraining from vigorous activity for ≥3 days. On the other 2 trials, a 45-min aerobic exercise bout was performed either 17-hours (Prior Day Ex) or 1-hour (Same Day Ex) before consuming the test meal. Compared to No Ex and Prior Day Ex, which did not differ from one another, there were lower AUCs on the Same Day Ex trial for glucose (6%), insulin (20%) and C-peptide (14%). Thus, a single moderate intensity exercise session can acutely improve glycemic control but the effect is modest and short-lived.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Postmeal responses in energy expenditure and fuel oxidation. Energy expenditure and the relative carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation were increased throughout the postmeal period relative to baseline but did not differ among trials.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362122&req=5

fig4: Postmeal responses in energy expenditure and fuel oxidation. Energy expenditure and the relative carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation were increased throughout the postmeal period relative to baseline but did not differ among trials.

Mentions: The average baseline REE (Figure 4) on the No Ex trial was 4.20 ± 0.09 kJ/min, which increased 26% at 1 hour after the meal and remained 20% and 18% elevated at 2 and 3 hours after the meal (P < 0.01 for postmeal comparisons with baseline value in each trial). Carbohydrate oxidation rose from 38% at baseline to 78% at 1-hour postmeal on the No Ex day, remaining above the fasting baseline through 3 hours (Figure 4). The total 3-hour carbohydrate oxidation was 31 ± 1 grams. Fasting and postprandial EE and fuel oxidation did not differ among trials.


The acute and residual effect of a single exercise session on meal glucose tolerance in sedentary young adults.

Short KR, Pratt LV, Teague AM - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Postmeal responses in energy expenditure and fuel oxidation. Energy expenditure and the relative carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation were increased throughout the postmeal period relative to baseline but did not differ among trials.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362122&req=5

fig4: Postmeal responses in energy expenditure and fuel oxidation. Energy expenditure and the relative carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation were increased throughout the postmeal period relative to baseline but did not differ among trials.
Mentions: The average baseline REE (Figure 4) on the No Ex trial was 4.20 ± 0.09 kJ/min, which increased 26% at 1 hour after the meal and remained 20% and 18% elevated at 2 and 3 hours after the meal (P < 0.01 for postmeal comparisons with baseline value in each trial). Carbohydrate oxidation rose from 38% at baseline to 78% at 1-hour postmeal on the No Ex day, remaining above the fasting baseline through 3 hours (Figure 4). The total 3-hour carbohydrate oxidation was 31 ± 1 grams. Fasting and postprandial EE and fuel oxidation did not differ among trials.

Bottom Line: The study goals were to (1) establish the variability in postprandial glucose control in healthy young people consuming a mixed meal and, then (2) determine the acute and residual impact of a single exercise bout on postprandial glucose control.There were strong test-retest correlations for the post-meal area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, and Cpeptide (r = 0.73-0.83) and the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI, r = 0.76), and between meal and IVGTT-derived ISI (r = 0.83).Thus, a single moderate intensity exercise session can acutely improve glycemic control but the effect is modest and short-lived.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 1200 Children's Ave, Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The study goals were to (1) establish the variability in postprandial glucose control in healthy young people consuming a mixed meal and, then (2) determine the acute and residual impact of a single exercise bout on postprandial glucose control. In study 1, 18 people completed two similar mixed meal trials and an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). There were strong test-retest correlations for the post-meal area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, and Cpeptide (r = 0.73-0.83) and the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI, r = 0.76), and between meal and IVGTT-derived ISI (r = 0.83). In study 2, 11 untrained young adults completed 3 trials. One trial (No Ex) was completed after refraining from vigorous activity for ≥3 days. On the other 2 trials, a 45-min aerobic exercise bout was performed either 17-hours (Prior Day Ex) or 1-hour (Same Day Ex) before consuming the test meal. Compared to No Ex and Prior Day Ex, which did not differ from one another, there were lower AUCs on the Same Day Ex trial for glucose (6%), insulin (20%) and C-peptide (14%). Thus, a single moderate intensity exercise session can acutely improve glycemic control but the effect is modest and short-lived.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus