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Concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco among US males and females.

Mushtaq N, Williams MB, Beebe LA - J Environ Public Health (2012)

Bottom Line: Younger age and heavy alcohol consumption were consistently associated with increased odds of CiST use among both males and females, and regardless of comparison group.This study identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with CiST use, and differences in these associations among women and men.Additionally, this study highlights the need to carefully consider what comparison groups should be used to examine factors associated with CiST use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 801 NE 13th Street, CHB-309, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. nasir-mushtaq@ouhsc.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The current study describes concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (CiST) among males and females and evaluates factors associated with CiST use.

Methods: Cross-sectional data were drawn from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Weighted stratified analyses were performed to find associations between CiST use and sociodemographic factors by gender. CiST users were compared to three different tobacco use groups: nonusers, exclusive smokers, and exclusive ST users.

Results: Younger age and heavy alcohol consumption were consistently associated with increased odds of CiST use among both males and females, and regardless of comparison group. Among males, education was inversely related to CiST use, and these findings were consistent in all three comparisons. Among women, those unable to work or out of work were more likely to be CiST users, which was consistent across comparisons. American Indian females had higher odds of CiST use than White females when nontobacco users or smokers were the comparison group.

Conclusion: This study identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with CiST use, and differences in these associations among women and men. Additionally, this study highlights the need to carefully consider what comparison groups should be used to examine factors associated with CiST use.

Show MeSH
Analysis framework for different comparison groups. Comparisons: (1) CiST versus nonusers of tobacco, (2) within subgroup “a” (CiST versus exclusive smokers), and (3) within subgroup “b” (CiST versus exclusive ST users). *Exclusive smokers (daily or someday), †exclusive ST users (daily or someday), CiST: concurrent users of cigarettes, and ST a: all smokers (exclusive and dual users) and b: all ST users (exclusive and dual users).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Analysis framework for different comparison groups. Comparisons: (1) CiST versus nonusers of tobacco, (2) within subgroup “a” (CiST versus exclusive smokers), and (3) within subgroup “b” (CiST versus exclusive ST users). *Exclusive smokers (daily or someday), †exclusive ST users (daily or someday), CiST: concurrent users of cigarettes, and ST a: all smokers (exclusive and dual users) and b: all ST users (exclusive and dual users).

Mentions: Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables in the study. Gender stratified weighted prevalences were calculated for all the variables including tobacco use patterns and sociodemographic characteristics. Weighted stratified analyses were performed to examine associations between CiST use and sociodemographic factors by gender. CiST users were compared to three different tobacco use groups: nonusers, exclusive smokers, and exclusive ST users (Figure 1).


Concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco among US males and females.

Mushtaq N, Williams MB, Beebe LA - J Environ Public Health (2012)

Analysis framework for different comparison groups. Comparisons: (1) CiST versus nonusers of tobacco, (2) within subgroup “a” (CiST versus exclusive smokers), and (3) within subgroup “b” (CiST versus exclusive ST users). *Exclusive smokers (daily or someday), †exclusive ST users (daily or someday), CiST: concurrent users of cigarettes, and ST a: all smokers (exclusive and dual users) and b: all ST users (exclusive and dual users).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362120&req=5

fig1: Analysis framework for different comparison groups. Comparisons: (1) CiST versus nonusers of tobacco, (2) within subgroup “a” (CiST versus exclusive smokers), and (3) within subgroup “b” (CiST versus exclusive ST users). *Exclusive smokers (daily or someday), †exclusive ST users (daily or someday), CiST: concurrent users of cigarettes, and ST a: all smokers (exclusive and dual users) and b: all ST users (exclusive and dual users).
Mentions: Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables in the study. Gender stratified weighted prevalences were calculated for all the variables including tobacco use patterns and sociodemographic characteristics. Weighted stratified analyses were performed to examine associations between CiST use and sociodemographic factors by gender. CiST users were compared to three different tobacco use groups: nonusers, exclusive smokers, and exclusive ST users (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Younger age and heavy alcohol consumption were consistently associated with increased odds of CiST use among both males and females, and regardless of comparison group.This study identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with CiST use, and differences in these associations among women and men.Additionally, this study highlights the need to carefully consider what comparison groups should be used to examine factors associated with CiST use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 801 NE 13th Street, CHB-309, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. nasir-mushtaq@ouhsc.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The current study describes concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (CiST) among males and females and evaluates factors associated with CiST use.

Methods: Cross-sectional data were drawn from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Weighted stratified analyses were performed to find associations between CiST use and sociodemographic factors by gender. CiST users were compared to three different tobacco use groups: nonusers, exclusive smokers, and exclusive ST users.

Results: Younger age and heavy alcohol consumption were consistently associated with increased odds of CiST use among both males and females, and regardless of comparison group. Among males, education was inversely related to CiST use, and these findings were consistent in all three comparisons. Among women, those unable to work or out of work were more likely to be CiST users, which was consistent across comparisons. American Indian females had higher odds of CiST use than White females when nontobacco users or smokers were the comparison group.

Conclusion: This study identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with CiST use, and differences in these associations among women and men. Additionally, this study highlights the need to carefully consider what comparison groups should be used to examine factors associated with CiST use.

Show MeSH