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Imaging review of skeletal tumors of the pelvis--part I: benign tumors of the pelvis.

Girish G, Finlay K, Morag Y, Brandon C, Jacobson J, Jamadar D - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

Bottom Line: Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses.Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions.The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, TC-2910, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0326, USA. ggirish@umich.edu

ABSTRACT
The osseous pelvis is a well-recognized site of origin of numerous primary and secondary musculoskeletal tumors. The radiologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion often begins with the plain film and proceeds to computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possibly biopsy. Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses. Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

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8-year-old male presented with left hip pain, diagnosed as Aneurysmal bone cyst. Plain film (a) demonstrates large expansile lytic lesion (arrows) involving medial left acetabulum extending to the inferior pubic rami (G: gonadal shield). Axial CT scan (b) obtained immediately following curettage and packing with bone allograft showing relatively dense material (asterisk) within the expanded left Ischium. Follow-up plain film (c) five years postsurgical curettage and embolization (note the embolization coils along the medial aspect of the hip) shows healing of the ABS with return to normal contour and course trabeculation. Unfortunately, a focus of recurrence is also noted in the superior acetabulum (asterisk). Local recurrence is not common, but possible.
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fig6: 8-year-old male presented with left hip pain, diagnosed as Aneurysmal bone cyst. Plain film (a) demonstrates large expansile lytic lesion (arrows) involving medial left acetabulum extending to the inferior pubic rami (G: gonadal shield). Axial CT scan (b) obtained immediately following curettage and packing with bone allograft showing relatively dense material (asterisk) within the expanded left Ischium. Follow-up plain film (c) five years postsurgical curettage and embolization (note the embolization coils along the medial aspect of the hip) shows healing of the ABS with return to normal contour and course trabeculation. Unfortunately, a focus of recurrence is also noted in the superior acetabulum (asterisk). Local recurrence is not common, but possible.

Mentions: The World Health Organization defines aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) as an expansile osteolytic lesion (Figure 6) with blood-filled spaces separated by connective tissue septa containing trabeculae of bone or osteoid, as well as osteoclast giant cells [37]. These lesions are most common in patients less then 20 years of age but can be seen in older patients. These lesions are slightly more common in females than males [38]. Fifty percent of flat bone ABCs are found in the pelvis [39].


Imaging review of skeletal tumors of the pelvis--part I: benign tumors of the pelvis.

Girish G, Finlay K, Morag Y, Brandon C, Jacobson J, Jamadar D - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

8-year-old male presented with left hip pain, diagnosed as Aneurysmal bone cyst. Plain film (a) demonstrates large expansile lytic lesion (arrows) involving medial left acetabulum extending to the inferior pubic rami (G: gonadal shield). Axial CT scan (b) obtained immediately following curettage and packing with bone allograft showing relatively dense material (asterisk) within the expanded left Ischium. Follow-up plain film (c) five years postsurgical curettage and embolization (note the embolization coils along the medial aspect of the hip) shows healing of the ABS with return to normal contour and course trabeculation. Unfortunately, a focus of recurrence is also noted in the superior acetabulum (asterisk). Local recurrence is not common, but possible.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3362015&req=5

fig6: 8-year-old male presented with left hip pain, diagnosed as Aneurysmal bone cyst. Plain film (a) demonstrates large expansile lytic lesion (arrows) involving medial left acetabulum extending to the inferior pubic rami (G: gonadal shield). Axial CT scan (b) obtained immediately following curettage and packing with bone allograft showing relatively dense material (asterisk) within the expanded left Ischium. Follow-up plain film (c) five years postsurgical curettage and embolization (note the embolization coils along the medial aspect of the hip) shows healing of the ABS with return to normal contour and course trabeculation. Unfortunately, a focus of recurrence is also noted in the superior acetabulum (asterisk). Local recurrence is not common, but possible.
Mentions: The World Health Organization defines aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) as an expansile osteolytic lesion (Figure 6) with blood-filled spaces separated by connective tissue septa containing trabeculae of bone or osteoid, as well as osteoclast giant cells [37]. These lesions are most common in patients less then 20 years of age but can be seen in older patients. These lesions are slightly more common in females than males [38]. Fifty percent of flat bone ABCs are found in the pelvis [39].

Bottom Line: Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses.Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions.The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, TC-2910, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0326, USA. ggirish@umich.edu

ABSTRACT
The osseous pelvis is a well-recognized site of origin of numerous primary and secondary musculoskeletal tumors. The radiologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion often begins with the plain film and proceeds to computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possibly biopsy. Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses. Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus