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Clinical Predictors of Mortality in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities with and without Down Syndrome.

Thorpe L, Pahwa P, Bennett V, Kirk A, Nanson J - Curr Gerontol Geriatr Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Conclusion.Although adults with DS have had considerable improvements in life expectancy over time, they are still disadvantaged compared to adults with ID without DS.Recognition of potentially modifiable factors such as depression may decrease this risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Community Health & Epidemiology and Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0W8.

ABSTRACT
Background. Mood, baseline functioning, and cognitive abilities as well as psychotropic medications may contribute to mortality in adults with and without Down Syndrome (DS). Methods. Population-based (nonclinical), community-dwelling adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) were recruited between 1995 and 2000, assessed individually for 1-4 times, and then followed by yearly phone calls. Results. 360 participants (116 with DS and 244 without DS) were followed for an average of 12.9 years (range 0-16.1 years as of July 2011). 108 people died during the course of the followup, 65 males (31.9% of all male participants) and 43 females (27.6% of all female participants). Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that baseline practical skills, seizures, anticonvulsant use, depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline over the first six years all significantly contributed to mortality, as did a diagnosis of DS, male gender, and higher age at study entry. Analysis stratified by DS showed interesting differences in mortality predictors. Conclusion. Although adults with DS have had considerable improvements in life expectancy over time, they are still disadvantaged compared to adults with ID without DS. Recognition of potentially modifiable factors such as depression may decrease this risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Length of follow-up of study participants by July 2011.
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fig2: Length of follow-up of study participants by July 2011.

Mentions: At the most recent analysis in July 2011, 108 participants had died, and 9 had withdrawn for various reasons, leaving 243 in active followup. Follow-up time varied from 0 (only one assessment before leaving the study for any reason) to 16.1 years as of July 2011, with the mean of 12.93 (0.21) years (Figure 2).


Clinical Predictors of Mortality in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities with and without Down Syndrome.

Thorpe L, Pahwa P, Bennett V, Kirk A, Nanson J - Curr Gerontol Geriatr Res (2012)

Length of follow-up of study participants by July 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3361991&req=5

fig2: Length of follow-up of study participants by July 2011.
Mentions: At the most recent analysis in July 2011, 108 participants had died, and 9 had withdrawn for various reasons, leaving 243 in active followup. Follow-up time varied from 0 (only one assessment before leaving the study for any reason) to 16.1 years as of July 2011, with the mean of 12.93 (0.21) years (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Conclusion.Although adults with DS have had considerable improvements in life expectancy over time, they are still disadvantaged compared to adults with ID without DS.Recognition of potentially modifiable factors such as depression may decrease this risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Community Health & Epidemiology and Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0W8.

ABSTRACT
Background. Mood, baseline functioning, and cognitive abilities as well as psychotropic medications may contribute to mortality in adults with and without Down Syndrome (DS). Methods. Population-based (nonclinical), community-dwelling adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) were recruited between 1995 and 2000, assessed individually for 1-4 times, and then followed by yearly phone calls. Results. 360 participants (116 with DS and 244 without DS) were followed for an average of 12.9 years (range 0-16.1 years as of July 2011). 108 people died during the course of the followup, 65 males (31.9% of all male participants) and 43 females (27.6% of all female participants). Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that baseline practical skills, seizures, anticonvulsant use, depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline over the first six years all significantly contributed to mortality, as did a diagnosis of DS, male gender, and higher age at study entry. Analysis stratified by DS showed interesting differences in mortality predictors. Conclusion. Although adults with DS have had considerable improvements in life expectancy over time, they are still disadvantaged compared to adults with ID without DS. Recognition of potentially modifiable factors such as depression may decrease this risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus