Limits...
In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems.

Kothari A, Narendran V, Saravanan VR - Indian J Ophthalmol (2012 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis.Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions.This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retina Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Coimbatore, India.

ABSTRACT
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Color fundus photograph of a patient with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), small subhyaloid hemorrhage, and persistent flashes. Arrow demonstrates scan direction of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in (b); (b) OCT through suspected area demonstrates vitreous hemorrhage (asterisk), edge of PVD with hyperreflective subhyaloid hemorrhage (arrowhead), and underlying intact retina; (c) OCT of suspected retinal flap demonstrates retinal tag with intact retina; (d) OCT demonstrating partial thickness retinal defect along with retinal flap. This case was kept under observation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3361828&req=5

Figure 5: (a) Color fundus photograph of a patient with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), small subhyaloid hemorrhage, and persistent flashes. Arrow demonstrates scan direction of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in (b); (b) OCT through suspected area demonstrates vitreous hemorrhage (asterisk), edge of PVD with hyperreflective subhyaloid hemorrhage (arrowhead), and underlying intact retina; (c) OCT of suspected retinal flap demonstrates retinal tag with intact retina; (d) OCT demonstrating partial thickness retinal defect along with retinal flap. This case was kept under observation

Mentions: SD-OCT scanning was done in three patients with persistent flashes and clinical difficulty in ruling out suspected tears due to subhyaloid blood. OCT through the suspected area demonstrated retinal continuity in two patients and an occult break in the third. Two eyes with suspected small horseshoe flaps were scanned. One of these demonstrated a partial thickness defect alone [Fig. 5].


In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems.

Kothari A, Narendran V, Saravanan VR - Indian J Ophthalmol (2012 May-Jun)

(a) Color fundus photograph of a patient with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), small subhyaloid hemorrhage, and persistent flashes. Arrow demonstrates scan direction of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in (b); (b) OCT through suspected area demonstrates vitreous hemorrhage (asterisk), edge of PVD with hyperreflective subhyaloid hemorrhage (arrowhead), and underlying intact retina; (c) OCT of suspected retinal flap demonstrates retinal tag with intact retina; (d) OCT demonstrating partial thickness retinal defect along with retinal flap. This case was kept under observation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3361828&req=5

Figure 5: (a) Color fundus photograph of a patient with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), small subhyaloid hemorrhage, and persistent flashes. Arrow demonstrates scan direction of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in (b); (b) OCT through suspected area demonstrates vitreous hemorrhage (asterisk), edge of PVD with hyperreflective subhyaloid hemorrhage (arrowhead), and underlying intact retina; (c) OCT of suspected retinal flap demonstrates retinal tag with intact retina; (d) OCT demonstrating partial thickness retinal defect along with retinal flap. This case was kept under observation
Mentions: SD-OCT scanning was done in three patients with persistent flashes and clinical difficulty in ruling out suspected tears due to subhyaloid blood. OCT through the suspected area demonstrated retinal continuity in two patients and an occult break in the third. Two eyes with suspected small horseshoe flaps were scanned. One of these demonstrated a partial thickness defect alone [Fig. 5].

Bottom Line: Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis.Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions.This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retina Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Coimbatore, India.

ABSTRACT
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus