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A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams.

Eikeland Husebø SI, Bjørshol CA, Rystedt H, Friberg F, Søreide E - Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med (2012)

Bottom Line: While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio.We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables.We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist.Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway. sissel.i.husebo@uis.no

ABSTRACT

Background: Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR) in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance.

Methods: We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14) performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14) performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance.

Results: Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio.We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables.

Conclusion: We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team-training of nursing students.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Outline of research design.
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Figure 1: Outline of research design.

Mentions: Three weeks prior to the simulation, all students received the team schedule list, a short description of the scenario and the learning objectives. The learning objectives were: 1) using the D-CPR guidelines in practice, and 2) optimizing teamwork in resuscitation teams. The D-CPR course was developed for the last semester in nursing education and comprised a two-hour lecture in class about the semi-automatic defibrillator. All teams were given 45 min of individual practical training in CPR and use of a semi-automatic defibrillator [21,22] before participating in the team-based simulation of a cardiac arrest. For each simulation, teams in Group A participated in the simulation scenario while teams in Group B were present in the room to observe. After completion of the post-simulation debriefing, Group B performed the simulation scenario, while Group A observed (Figure 1).


A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams.

Eikeland Husebø SI, Bjørshol CA, Rystedt H, Friberg F, Søreide E - Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med (2012)

Outline of research design.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3361478&req=5

Figure 1: Outline of research design.
Mentions: Three weeks prior to the simulation, all students received the team schedule list, a short description of the scenario and the learning objectives. The learning objectives were: 1) using the D-CPR guidelines in practice, and 2) optimizing teamwork in resuscitation teams. The D-CPR course was developed for the last semester in nursing education and comprised a two-hour lecture in class about the semi-automatic defibrillator. All teams were given 45 min of individual practical training in CPR and use of a semi-automatic defibrillator [21,22] before participating in the team-based simulation of a cardiac arrest. For each simulation, teams in Group A participated in the simulation scenario while teams in Group B were present in the room to observe. After completion of the post-simulation debriefing, Group B performed the simulation scenario, while Group A observed (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio.We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables.We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist.Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway. sissel.i.husebo@uis.no

ABSTRACT

Background: Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR) in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance.

Methods: We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14) performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14) performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance.

Results: Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio.We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables.

Conclusion: We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team-training of nursing students.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus