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Pericardial effusion of HIV-infected patients ? Results of a prospective multicenter cohort study in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

Lind A, Reinsch N, Neuhaus K, Esser S, Brockmeyer NH, Potthoff A, Pankuweit S, Erbel R, Maisch B, Neumann T - Eur. J. Med. Res. (2011)

Bottom Line: Previous publications described pericardial effusion as one of the most common HIV-associated cardiac affiliations.Pericardial effusions were present in only two patients of the analysed population.None of the participants had signs of a relevant cardiovascular impairment by pericardial effusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: West German Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg/Essen, Essen, Germany. alexander.lind@uk-essen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous publications described pericardial effusion as one of the most common HIV-associated cardiac affiliations. The aim of the current study was to investigate if pericardial effusion still has a relevant meaning of HIV-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

Methods: The HIV-HEART (HIV-infection and HEART disease) study is a cardiology driven, prospective and multicenter cohort study. Outpatients with a known HIV-infection were recruited during a 20-month period in a consecutive manner from September 2004 to May 2006. The study comprehend classic parameters of HIV-infection, comprising CD4-cell count (cluster of differentiation) and virus load, as well as non-invasive tests of cardiac diseases, including a thorough transthoracic echocardiography.

Results: 802 HIV-infected patients (female: 16.6%) with a mean age of 44.2 ± 10.3 years, were included. Duration of HIV-infection since initial diagnosis was 7.6 ± 5.8 years. Of all participants, 85.2% received antiretroviral therapy. Virus load was detectable in 34.4% and CD4 - cell count was in 12.4% less than 200 cells/μl. Pericardial effusions were present in only two patients of the analysed population. None of the participants had signs of a relevant cardiovascular impairment by pericardial effusion.

Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that the era of antiretroviral therapy goes along with low rates of pericardial effusions in HIV-infected outpatients. Our findings are in contrast to the results of publications, performed before the common use of antiretroviral therapy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pericardial effusion of an asymptomatic HIV-infected subject. The pericardial effusion was first identified by echocardiography in the present study.
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Figure 1: Pericardial effusion of an asymptomatic HIV-infected subject. The pericardial effusion was first identified by echocardiography in the present study.


Pericardial effusion of HIV-infected patients ? Results of a prospective multicenter cohort study in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

Lind A, Reinsch N, Neuhaus K, Esser S, Brockmeyer NH, Potthoff A, Pankuweit S, Erbel R, Maisch B, Neumann T - Eur. J. Med. Res. (2011)

Pericardial effusion of an asymptomatic HIV-infected subject. The pericardial effusion was first identified by echocardiography in the present study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3351804&req=5

Figure 1: Pericardial effusion of an asymptomatic HIV-infected subject. The pericardial effusion was first identified by echocardiography in the present study.
Bottom Line: Previous publications described pericardial effusion as one of the most common HIV-associated cardiac affiliations.Pericardial effusions were present in only two patients of the analysed population.None of the participants had signs of a relevant cardiovascular impairment by pericardial effusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: West German Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg/Essen, Essen, Germany. alexander.lind@uk-essen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous publications described pericardial effusion as one of the most common HIV-associated cardiac affiliations. The aim of the current study was to investigate if pericardial effusion still has a relevant meaning of HIV-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

Methods: The HIV-HEART (HIV-infection and HEART disease) study is a cardiology driven, prospective and multicenter cohort study. Outpatients with a known HIV-infection were recruited during a 20-month period in a consecutive manner from September 2004 to May 2006. The study comprehend classic parameters of HIV-infection, comprising CD4-cell count (cluster of differentiation) and virus load, as well as non-invasive tests of cardiac diseases, including a thorough transthoracic echocardiography.

Results: 802 HIV-infected patients (female: 16.6%) with a mean age of 44.2 ± 10.3 years, were included. Duration of HIV-infection since initial diagnosis was 7.6 ± 5.8 years. Of all participants, 85.2% received antiretroviral therapy. Virus load was detectable in 34.4% and CD4 - cell count was in 12.4% less than 200 cells/μl. Pericardial effusions were present in only two patients of the analysed population. None of the participants had signs of a relevant cardiovascular impairment by pericardial effusion.

Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that the era of antiretroviral therapy goes along with low rates of pericardial effusions in HIV-infected outpatients. Our findings are in contrast to the results of publications, performed before the common use of antiretroviral therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus