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Phenol levels during intralesional curettage and local adjuvant treatment of benign and low-grade malignant bone tumours.

Verdegaal SH, Hartigh Jd, Hogendoorn PC, Brouwers HF, Taminiau AH - Clin Sarcoma Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Despite its use for a long time, no information is available about the local concentration of phenol that is achieved in an individual patient, and the most sufficient and safe procedure to wash out the phenol after using it as local adjuvant. 1.Phenol concentrations had wide variety in different patients, but all decreased by rinsing with ethanol.The local concentration of phenol diminishes to an acceptable concentration of 0.2%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. shmverdegaal@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Phenol is widely used for years as local adjuvant treatment for bone tumours. Despite its use for a long time, no information is available about the local concentration of phenol that is achieved in an individual patient, and the most sufficient and safe procedure to wash out the phenol after using it as local adjuvant.

Questions/purposes: 1. What is the initial local concentration of phenol in the tissue of the cavity wall after the application of phenol? 2. How quickly is phenol 85% diluted by washing the bone cavity with ethanol 96% solution? 3. Is the degree and speed of dilution influenced by the size of the cavity? 4. How many times should the cavity be rinsed to obtain sufficient elimination of phenol?

Methods: A basic science study was performed at respectively 16 and 10 patients, treated by intralesional curettage and adjuvant therapy for low-grade central chondrosarcoma of bone. Test 1:in 16 patients ten samples were collected of the mixture of phenol and ethanol from the bone cavity. Test 2:in ten patients, two biopsy samples were taken from the cavity wall in the bone during surgery.

Results: Phenol concentrations had wide variety in different patients, but all decreased by rinsing with ethanol.

Conclusions: Ethanol 96% is effective to wash out local applicated phenol, by rinsing the bone cavity six times. The local concentration of phenol diminishes to an acceptable concentration of 0.2%. This study provides new insights to safely further improve the surgical technique of intralesional treatment of bone tumours.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box Plot of concentration phenol and surface of bone cavity. Relation between concentrations of phenol measured in ethanol (ppm) and surface of the bone cavity. No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities.
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Figure 2: Box Plot of concentration phenol and surface of bone cavity. Relation between concentrations of phenol measured in ethanol (ppm) and surface of the bone cavity. No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities.

Mentions: No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities (Figure 2).


Phenol levels during intralesional curettage and local adjuvant treatment of benign and low-grade malignant bone tumours.

Verdegaal SH, Hartigh Jd, Hogendoorn PC, Brouwers HF, Taminiau AH - Clin Sarcoma Res (2012)

Box Plot of concentration phenol and surface of bone cavity. Relation between concentrations of phenol measured in ethanol (ppm) and surface of the bone cavity. No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3351749&req=5

Figure 2: Box Plot of concentration phenol and surface of bone cavity. Relation between concentrations of phenol measured in ethanol (ppm) and surface of the bone cavity. No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities.
Mentions: No correlation is seen between the concentrations of phenol in ethanol in large or small cavities (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Despite its use for a long time, no information is available about the local concentration of phenol that is achieved in an individual patient, and the most sufficient and safe procedure to wash out the phenol after using it as local adjuvant. 1.Phenol concentrations had wide variety in different patients, but all decreased by rinsing with ethanol.The local concentration of phenol diminishes to an acceptable concentration of 0.2%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. shmverdegaal@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Phenol is widely used for years as local adjuvant treatment for bone tumours. Despite its use for a long time, no information is available about the local concentration of phenol that is achieved in an individual patient, and the most sufficient and safe procedure to wash out the phenol after using it as local adjuvant.

Questions/purposes: 1. What is the initial local concentration of phenol in the tissue of the cavity wall after the application of phenol? 2. How quickly is phenol 85% diluted by washing the bone cavity with ethanol 96% solution? 3. Is the degree and speed of dilution influenced by the size of the cavity? 4. How many times should the cavity be rinsed to obtain sufficient elimination of phenol?

Methods: A basic science study was performed at respectively 16 and 10 patients, treated by intralesional curettage and adjuvant therapy for low-grade central chondrosarcoma of bone. Test 1:in 16 patients ten samples were collected of the mixture of phenol and ethanol from the bone cavity. Test 2:in ten patients, two biopsy samples were taken from the cavity wall in the bone during surgery.

Results: Phenol concentrations had wide variety in different patients, but all decreased by rinsing with ethanol.

Conclusions: Ethanol 96% is effective to wash out local applicated phenol, by rinsing the bone cavity six times. The local concentration of phenol diminishes to an acceptable concentration of 0.2%. This study provides new insights to safely further improve the surgical technique of intralesional treatment of bone tumours.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus