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Reward-related dorsal striatal activity differences between former and current cocaine dependent individuals during an interactive competitive game.

Hyatt CJ, Assaf M, Muska CE, Rosen RI, Thomas AD, Johnson MR, Hylton JL, Andrews MM, Reynolds BA, Krystal JH, Potenza MN, Pearlson GD - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear.Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward.Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America. Chyatt@harthosp.org

ABSTRACT
Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear. We assessed blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in ventral and dorsal striatum during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in current (CCD; n = 30) and former (FCD; n = 28) cocaine dependent subjects as well as healthy control (HC; n = 31) subjects while playing an interactive competitive Domino game involving risk-taking and reward/punishment processing. Out-of-scanner impulsivity-related measures were also collected. Although both FCD and CCD subjects scored significantly higher on impulsivity-related measures than did HC subjects, only FCD subjects had differences in striatal activation, specifically showing hypoactivation during their response to gains versus losses in right dorsal caudate, a brain region linked to habituation, cocaine craving and addiction maintenance. Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward. These findings suggest that remitted cocaine dependence is associated with striatal dysfunction during social reward processing in a manner linked to compulsivity and reward sensitivity measures. Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses).

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Statistical parametric one-sample t-maps of the Gain-Loss contrast for all groups combined (n = 89 subjects) that delineates the “Reward network”.Axial slices are labeled from z  = −18 mm to z  = +3 mm in steps of 3 mm. The threshold was set at p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected.
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pone-0034917-g002: Statistical parametric one-sample t-maps of the Gain-Loss contrast for all groups combined (n = 89 subjects) that delineates the “Reward network”.Axial slices are labeled from z  = −18 mm to z  = +3 mm in steps of 3 mm. The threshold was set at p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected.

Mentions: A one-sample t-test for the Gain-Loss contrast across all subjects from the three groups (n = 89), showed strong activity in reward-related brain regions including bilateral ventral striatum, right dorsal striatum (caudate) and left and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (see Figure 2, p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected). Table 3, top provides the locations (MNI coordinates) and t-scores for each region of significant activity.


Reward-related dorsal striatal activity differences between former and current cocaine dependent individuals during an interactive competitive game.

Hyatt CJ, Assaf M, Muska CE, Rosen RI, Thomas AD, Johnson MR, Hylton JL, Andrews MM, Reynolds BA, Krystal JH, Potenza MN, Pearlson GD - PLoS ONE (2012)

Statistical parametric one-sample t-maps of the Gain-Loss contrast for all groups combined (n = 89 subjects) that delineates the “Reward network”.Axial slices are labeled from z  = −18 mm to z  = +3 mm in steps of 3 mm. The threshold was set at p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3351439&req=5

pone-0034917-g002: Statistical parametric one-sample t-maps of the Gain-Loss contrast for all groups combined (n = 89 subjects) that delineates the “Reward network”.Axial slices are labeled from z  = −18 mm to z  = +3 mm in steps of 3 mm. The threshold was set at p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected.
Mentions: A one-sample t-test for the Gain-Loss contrast across all subjects from the three groups (n = 89), showed strong activity in reward-related brain regions including bilateral ventral striatum, right dorsal striatum (caudate) and left and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (see Figure 2, p<0.05, FWE whole-brain corrected). Table 3, top provides the locations (MNI coordinates) and t-scores for each region of significant activity.

Bottom Line: Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear.Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward.Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America. Chyatt@harthosp.org

ABSTRACT
Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear. We assessed blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in ventral and dorsal striatum during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in current (CCD; n = 30) and former (FCD; n = 28) cocaine dependent subjects as well as healthy control (HC; n = 31) subjects while playing an interactive competitive Domino game involving risk-taking and reward/punishment processing. Out-of-scanner impulsivity-related measures were also collected. Although both FCD and CCD subjects scored significantly higher on impulsivity-related measures than did HC subjects, only FCD subjects had differences in striatal activation, specifically showing hypoactivation during their response to gains versus losses in right dorsal caudate, a brain region linked to habituation, cocaine craving and addiction maintenance. Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward. These findings suggest that remitted cocaine dependence is associated with striatal dysfunction during social reward processing in a manner linked to compulsivity and reward sensitivity measures. Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus