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Open-field arena boundary is a primary object of exploration for Drosophila.

Soibam B, Mann M, Liu L, Tran J, Lobaina M, Kang YY, Gunaratne GH, Pletcher S, Roman G - Brain Behav (2012)

Bottom Line: These experiments support the conclusion that the wall-following behavior of Drosophila is best characterized by a preference for the arena boundary, and not thigmotaxis or centrophobicity.Since the boundary preference could derive from highly linear trajectories, we further developed a simulation program to model the effects of turn angle on the boundary preference.Hence, low turn angled movement does not drive the boundary preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Drosophila adults, when placed into a novel open-field arena, initially exhibit an elevated level of activity followed by a reduced stable level of spontaneous activity and spend a majority of time near the arena edge, executing motions along the walls. In order to determine the environmental features that are responsible for the initial high activity and wall-following behavior exhibited during exploration, we examined wild-type and visually impaired mutants in arenas with different vertical surfaces. These experiments support the conclusion that the wall-following behavior of Drosophila is best characterized by a preference for the arena boundary, and not thigmotaxis or centrophobicity. In circular arenas, Drosophila mostly move in trajectories with low turn angles. Since the boundary preference could derive from highly linear trajectories, we further developed a simulation program to model the effects of turn angle on the boundary preference. In an hourglass-shaped arena with convex-angled walls that forced a straight versus wall-following choice, the simulation with constrained turn angles predicted general movement across a central gap, whereas Drosophila tend to follow the wall. Hence, low turn angled movement does not drive the boundary preference. Lastly, visually impaired Drosophila demonstrate a defect in attenuation of the elevated initial activity. Interestingly, the visually impaired w(1118) activity decay defect can be rescued by increasing the contrast of the arena's edge, suggesting that the activity decay relies on visual detection of the boundary. The arena boundary is, therefore, a primary object of exploration for Drosophila.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flies display wall-following behavior in an hourglass-shaped arena. (A). The hourglass arena. This arena is 10 cm long × 5 cm wide, and 0.7 cm in height. A fly walking in this arena may make an HT by following the wall from one chamber into the next, or it may make a VT by crossing the 2 cm central chasm. (B). There were no significant differences between Canton-S and the blind norpA7 in either the number of vertical (F1,57 = 0.280, P = 0.599) or horizontal (F1,57 = 0.0003, P = 0.98) transitions at the chasm. n = 32 for each genotype. The VT indexes are negative for both genotypes. (C). Wall-following behavior does not require walking on the walls in the hourglass arena. Canton-S males were examined for vertical and HTs. The position of the fly, either walking on the wall or walking adjacent to the wall, was recorded for each transition. The VT index was separately determined for all transitions or with the wall-walking transitions excluded. n = 64.
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fig07: Flies display wall-following behavior in an hourglass-shaped arena. (A). The hourglass arena. This arena is 10 cm long × 5 cm wide, and 0.7 cm in height. A fly walking in this arena may make an HT by following the wall from one chamber into the next, or it may make a VT by crossing the 2 cm central chasm. (B). There were no significant differences between Canton-S and the blind norpA7 in either the number of vertical (F1,57 = 0.280, P = 0.599) or horizontal (F1,57 = 0.0003, P = 0.98) transitions at the chasm. n = 32 for each genotype. The VT indexes are negative for both genotypes. (C). Wall-following behavior does not require walking on the walls in the hourglass arena. Canton-S males were examined for vertical and HTs. The position of the fly, either walking on the wall or walking adjacent to the wall, was recorded for each transition. The VT index was separately determined for all transitions or with the wall-walking transitions excluded. n = 64.

Mentions: In order to further examine this hypothesis, we simulated the movement of a fly with different FoM constraints in an hourglass-shaped arena (Creed and Miller 1990). The probative value of this arena comes from a gap that forces a choice between walking straight (vertical crossing) and following the wall (horizontal crossing; Fig. 7A). The minimum VT index was obtained with fields of motion of 90°, and even at 180° the simulations produced significantly greater VTs than HTs (Fig. 6C). If a restricted FoM of 25–30° is responsible for driving the edge preference of Drosophila in open-field arenas, then we predict that in an hourglass arena, Canton-S will display a VT index close to 0.9.


Open-field arena boundary is a primary object of exploration for Drosophila.

Soibam B, Mann M, Liu L, Tran J, Lobaina M, Kang YY, Gunaratne GH, Pletcher S, Roman G - Brain Behav (2012)

Flies display wall-following behavior in an hourglass-shaped arena. (A). The hourglass arena. This arena is 10 cm long × 5 cm wide, and 0.7 cm in height. A fly walking in this arena may make an HT by following the wall from one chamber into the next, or it may make a VT by crossing the 2 cm central chasm. (B). There were no significant differences between Canton-S and the blind norpA7 in either the number of vertical (F1,57 = 0.280, P = 0.599) or horizontal (F1,57 = 0.0003, P = 0.98) transitions at the chasm. n = 32 for each genotype. The VT indexes are negative for both genotypes. (C). Wall-following behavior does not require walking on the walls in the hourglass arena. Canton-S males were examined for vertical and HTs. The position of the fly, either walking on the wall or walking adjacent to the wall, was recorded for each transition. The VT index was separately determined for all transitions or with the wall-walking transitions excluded. n = 64.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345355&req=5

fig07: Flies display wall-following behavior in an hourglass-shaped arena. (A). The hourglass arena. This arena is 10 cm long × 5 cm wide, and 0.7 cm in height. A fly walking in this arena may make an HT by following the wall from one chamber into the next, or it may make a VT by crossing the 2 cm central chasm. (B). There were no significant differences between Canton-S and the blind norpA7 in either the number of vertical (F1,57 = 0.280, P = 0.599) or horizontal (F1,57 = 0.0003, P = 0.98) transitions at the chasm. n = 32 for each genotype. The VT indexes are negative for both genotypes. (C). Wall-following behavior does not require walking on the walls in the hourglass arena. Canton-S males were examined for vertical and HTs. The position of the fly, either walking on the wall or walking adjacent to the wall, was recorded for each transition. The VT index was separately determined for all transitions or with the wall-walking transitions excluded. n = 64.
Mentions: In order to further examine this hypothesis, we simulated the movement of a fly with different FoM constraints in an hourglass-shaped arena (Creed and Miller 1990). The probative value of this arena comes from a gap that forces a choice between walking straight (vertical crossing) and following the wall (horizontal crossing; Fig. 7A). The minimum VT index was obtained with fields of motion of 90°, and even at 180° the simulations produced significantly greater VTs than HTs (Fig. 6C). If a restricted FoM of 25–30° is responsible for driving the edge preference of Drosophila in open-field arenas, then we predict that in an hourglass arena, Canton-S will display a VT index close to 0.9.

Bottom Line: These experiments support the conclusion that the wall-following behavior of Drosophila is best characterized by a preference for the arena boundary, and not thigmotaxis or centrophobicity.Since the boundary preference could derive from highly linear trajectories, we further developed a simulation program to model the effects of turn angle on the boundary preference.Hence, low turn angled movement does not drive the boundary preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Drosophila adults, when placed into a novel open-field arena, initially exhibit an elevated level of activity followed by a reduced stable level of spontaneous activity and spend a majority of time near the arena edge, executing motions along the walls. In order to determine the environmental features that are responsible for the initial high activity and wall-following behavior exhibited during exploration, we examined wild-type and visually impaired mutants in arenas with different vertical surfaces. These experiments support the conclusion that the wall-following behavior of Drosophila is best characterized by a preference for the arena boundary, and not thigmotaxis or centrophobicity. In circular arenas, Drosophila mostly move in trajectories with low turn angles. Since the boundary preference could derive from highly linear trajectories, we further developed a simulation program to model the effects of turn angle on the boundary preference. In an hourglass-shaped arena with convex-angled walls that forced a straight versus wall-following choice, the simulation with constrained turn angles predicted general movement across a central gap, whereas Drosophila tend to follow the wall. Hence, low turn angled movement does not drive the boundary preference. Lastly, visually impaired Drosophila demonstrate a defect in attenuation of the elevated initial activity. Interestingly, the visually impaired w(1118) activity decay defect can be rescued by increasing the contrast of the arena's edge, suggesting that the activity decay relies on visual detection of the boundary. The arena boundary is, therefore, a primary object of exploration for Drosophila.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus