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Nonhuman primate induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

Wu Y, Mishra A, Qiu Z, Farnsworth S, Tardif SD, Hornsby PJ - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Bottom Line: Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models.Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies.We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA.

ABSTRACT
Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models. Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies. We review here the progress made in deriving and characterizing iPS cell lines from different NHP species. We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled. The marmoset can serve as a model for the implementation of patient-specific autologous cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Marmoset iPS cells growing in feeder-free culture. (a) An iPS cell line derived by coinfection with four retroviruses (B8 cell line [25]). Cells are growing in defined xeno-free medium (Pluriton, Stemgent). (b) An iPS cell line derived by infection with a single retrovirus, encoding the OSKM reprogramming factors, illustrated in Figure 2.
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fig3: Marmoset iPS cells growing in feeder-free culture. (a) An iPS cell line derived by coinfection with four retroviruses (B8 cell line [25]). Cells are growing in defined xeno-free medium (Pluriton, Stemgent). (b) An iPS cell line derived by infection with a single retrovirus, encoding the OSKM reprogramming factors, illustrated in Figure 2.

Mentions: Successful long-term expansion of marmoset iPS cells is critical for any extensive studies of the properties of the cells. Although we determined feeder-free conditions for growth of the cells, these conditions require fetal bovine serum and medium conditioned by a suitable cell type, such as mouse embryo fibroblasts. More recently, we have established that marmoset iPS cells can grow continuously and over long periods in defined medium without the addition of serum or of medium conditioned by another cell type. Several types of defined media support long-term marmoset iPS cell growth without loss of expression of pluripotency genes such as NANOG and OCT4/POU5F1. Both clones derived by coinfection and clones derived by infection with a polycistronic vector may be grown in defined medium (Figure 3).


Nonhuman primate induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

Wu Y, Mishra A, Qiu Z, Farnsworth S, Tardif SD, Hornsby PJ - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Marmoset iPS cells growing in feeder-free culture. (a) An iPS cell line derived by coinfection with four retroviruses (B8 cell line [25]). Cells are growing in defined xeno-free medium (Pluriton, Stemgent). (b) An iPS cell line derived by infection with a single retrovirus, encoding the OSKM reprogramming factors, illustrated in Figure 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345260&req=5

fig3: Marmoset iPS cells growing in feeder-free culture. (a) An iPS cell line derived by coinfection with four retroviruses (B8 cell line [25]). Cells are growing in defined xeno-free medium (Pluriton, Stemgent). (b) An iPS cell line derived by infection with a single retrovirus, encoding the OSKM reprogramming factors, illustrated in Figure 2.
Mentions: Successful long-term expansion of marmoset iPS cells is critical for any extensive studies of the properties of the cells. Although we determined feeder-free conditions for growth of the cells, these conditions require fetal bovine serum and medium conditioned by a suitable cell type, such as mouse embryo fibroblasts. More recently, we have established that marmoset iPS cells can grow continuously and over long periods in defined medium without the addition of serum or of medium conditioned by another cell type. Several types of defined media support long-term marmoset iPS cell growth without loss of expression of pluripotency genes such as NANOG and OCT4/POU5F1. Both clones derived by coinfection and clones derived by infection with a polycistronic vector may be grown in defined medium (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models.Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies.We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA.

ABSTRACT
Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models. Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies. We review here the progress made in deriving and characterizing iPS cell lines from different NHP species. We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled. The marmoset can serve as a model for the implementation of patient-specific autologous cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus