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Nonhuman primate induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

Wu Y, Mishra A, Qiu Z, Farnsworth S, Tardif SD, Hornsby PJ - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Bottom Line: Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models.Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies.We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA.

ABSTRACT
Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models. Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies. We review here the progress made in deriving and characterizing iPS cell lines from different NHP species. We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled. The marmoset can serve as a model for the implementation of patient-specific autologous cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.


The marmoset as a preclinical model for patient-specific iPS cells in regenerative medicine. This scheme outlines progress to date and future studies of autologous cell transplantation using reprogramming and redifferentiation to a specific cell lineage. A skin biopsy is taken from an individual marmoset, and fibroblasts from the biopsy are grown in culture. Reprogramming factors are expressed in the cells; over a period of several weeks, clones of cells arise that may be iPS cells. Clones are isolated and screened to determine whether they are properly reprogrammed iPS cells; if so, they are expanded and cryopreserved. Neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) are derived from these iPS cells via protocols described in the text. If the NPCs pass stringent tests of differentiation potential and safety, in the future they may be implanted into the CNS of the same individual from which the cells were originally derived.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The marmoset as a preclinical model for patient-specific iPS cells in regenerative medicine. This scheme outlines progress to date and future studies of autologous cell transplantation using reprogramming and redifferentiation to a specific cell lineage. A skin biopsy is taken from an individual marmoset, and fibroblasts from the biopsy are grown in culture. Reprogramming factors are expressed in the cells; over a period of several weeks, clones of cells arise that may be iPS cells. Clones are isolated and screened to determine whether they are properly reprogrammed iPS cells; if so, they are expanded and cryopreserved. Neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) are derived from these iPS cells via protocols described in the text. If the NPCs pass stringent tests of differentiation potential and safety, in the future they may be implanted into the CNS of the same individual from which the cells were originally derived.

Mentions: Thus there is a clear path from basic to translational studies in iPS cell-based regenerative medicine in NHPs. Of the various NHPs that could be used, the marmoset has several key advantages. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has the advantage of smaller size, more rapid breeding, and defined housing conditions. In contrast to humans, where uncontrolled environment and many comorbidities are confounding factors, marmosets can be housed in a defined environment and have few known comorbidities [12]. A variety of human diseases can potentially be modeled in marmosets [13–15]. A chemical-induced model of Parkinson's disease has also been developed in this species [16] and a stroke model [17] has been developed. Histological and MRI brain atlases are available [18]. The marmoset genome has been completed [19], and the marmoset is the first and so far only primate to have transgenic models that show germline transmission [20]. Although transgenics have also been created in the rhesus macaque, they have not passed the transgene to their offspring [21]. A genetic model of Parkinson's disease by overexpression of α-synuclein has been developed in the marmoset [20]. Finally, a spinal cord injury model in the marmoset has been used in tests of transplanted human neural stem cells for potential therapeutic effect [22, 23]. Our long-term goal is illustrated in Figure 1.


Nonhuman primate induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine.

Wu Y, Mishra A, Qiu Z, Farnsworth S, Tardif SD, Hornsby PJ - Stem Cells Int (2012)

The marmoset as a preclinical model for patient-specific iPS cells in regenerative medicine. This scheme outlines progress to date and future studies of autologous cell transplantation using reprogramming and redifferentiation to a specific cell lineage. A skin biopsy is taken from an individual marmoset, and fibroblasts from the biopsy are grown in culture. Reprogramming factors are expressed in the cells; over a period of several weeks, clones of cells arise that may be iPS cells. Clones are isolated and screened to determine whether they are properly reprogrammed iPS cells; if so, they are expanded and cryopreserved. Neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) are derived from these iPS cells via protocols described in the text. If the NPCs pass stringent tests of differentiation potential and safety, in the future they may be implanted into the CNS of the same individual from which the cells were originally derived.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345260&req=5

fig1: The marmoset as a preclinical model for patient-specific iPS cells in regenerative medicine. This scheme outlines progress to date and future studies of autologous cell transplantation using reprogramming and redifferentiation to a specific cell lineage. A skin biopsy is taken from an individual marmoset, and fibroblasts from the biopsy are grown in culture. Reprogramming factors are expressed in the cells; over a period of several weeks, clones of cells arise that may be iPS cells. Clones are isolated and screened to determine whether they are properly reprogrammed iPS cells; if so, they are expanded and cryopreserved. Neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) are derived from these iPS cells via protocols described in the text. If the NPCs pass stringent tests of differentiation potential and safety, in the future they may be implanted into the CNS of the same individual from which the cells were originally derived.
Mentions: Thus there is a clear path from basic to translational studies in iPS cell-based regenerative medicine in NHPs. Of the various NHPs that could be used, the marmoset has several key advantages. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has the advantage of smaller size, more rapid breeding, and defined housing conditions. In contrast to humans, where uncontrolled environment and many comorbidities are confounding factors, marmosets can be housed in a defined environment and have few known comorbidities [12]. A variety of human diseases can potentially be modeled in marmosets [13–15]. A chemical-induced model of Parkinson's disease has also been developed in this species [16] and a stroke model [17] has been developed. Histological and MRI brain atlases are available [18]. The marmoset genome has been completed [19], and the marmoset is the first and so far only primate to have transgenic models that show germline transmission [20]. Although transgenics have also been created in the rhesus macaque, they have not passed the transgene to their offspring [21]. A genetic model of Parkinson's disease by overexpression of α-synuclein has been developed in the marmoset [20]. Finally, a spinal cord injury model in the marmoset has been used in tests of transplanted human neural stem cells for potential therapeutic effect [22, 23]. Our long-term goal is illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models.Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies.We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA.

ABSTRACT
Among the various species from which induced pluripotent stem cells have been derived, nonhuman primates (NHPs) have a unique role as preclinical models. Their relatedness to humans and similar physiology, including central nervous system, make them ideal for translational studies. We review here the progress made in deriving and characterizing iPS cell lines from different NHP species. We focus on iPS cell lines from the marmoset, a small NHP in which several human disease states can be modeled. The marmoset can serve as a model for the implementation of patient-specific autologous cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.