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PPARα as a Transcriptional Regulator for Detoxification of Plant Diet-Derived Unfavorable Compounds.

Ashibe B, Nakajima Y, Fukui Y, Motojima K - PPAR Res (2012)

Bottom Line: A detailed analysis of this observation revealed that PPARα is involved in the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants as well as endobiotic substrates by inducing phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes.PPARα plays a vital role in direct or indirect activation of the relevant genes via the complex network among other xenobiotic nuclear receptors.Thus, PPARα plays its wider and more extensive role in energy metabolism from natural food intake to fat storage than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, 2-522-1 Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Plants contain potentially toxic compounds for animals and animals have developed physiological strategies to detoxify the ingested toxins during evolution. Feeding mice with various plant seeds and grains showed unexpected result that only sesame killed PPARα- mice but not wild-type mice at all. A detailed analysis of this observation revealed that PPARα is involved in the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants as well as endobiotic substrates by inducing phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes. PPARα plays a vital role in direct or indirect activation of the relevant genes via the complex network among other xenobiotic nuclear receptors. Thus, PPARα plays its wider and more extensive role in energy metabolism from natural food intake to fat storage than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.


Survival curve of normal and PPARα- mice on sesame diet. Male PPARα- mice on the sesame diet were followed until all  mice (n = 12) died. None of wild-type mice (n = 4) on the sesame diet or the PPARα- mice on normal diet died during these period. Time 0 is the day of starting the experiment using age-matched (14 weeks) mice on the sesame diet.
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fig1: Survival curve of normal and PPARα- mice on sesame diet. Male PPARα- mice on the sesame diet were followed until all mice (n = 12) died. None of wild-type mice (n = 4) on the sesame diet or the PPARα- mice on normal diet died during these period. Time 0 is the day of starting the experiment using age-matched (14 weeks) mice on the sesame diet.

Mentions: We next examined the survival curve of mice on sesame diet for a long period. Feeding wild-type mice with sesame seed diet had no effect on survival for at least 3 months (not shown) but PPARα- mice started to die in a few days and all died within 40 days after starting the sesame diet (Figure 1). This drastic effect was age and gender dependent; only male PPARα- mice of older than 14 weeks of age died on the sesame diet. During these periods, weight gain was not observed in wild-type mice and a gradual weight loss was seen in PPARα- mice, indicating that living only on sesame seeds is not healthy even for wild-type mice.


PPARα as a Transcriptional Regulator for Detoxification of Plant Diet-Derived Unfavorable Compounds.

Ashibe B, Nakajima Y, Fukui Y, Motojima K - PPAR Res (2012)

Survival curve of normal and PPARα- mice on sesame diet. Male PPARα- mice on the sesame diet were followed until all  mice (n = 12) died. None of wild-type mice (n = 4) on the sesame diet or the PPARα- mice on normal diet died during these period. Time 0 is the day of starting the experiment using age-matched (14 weeks) mice on the sesame diet.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345252&req=5

fig1: Survival curve of normal and PPARα- mice on sesame diet. Male PPARα- mice on the sesame diet were followed until all mice (n = 12) died. None of wild-type mice (n = 4) on the sesame diet or the PPARα- mice on normal diet died during these period. Time 0 is the day of starting the experiment using age-matched (14 weeks) mice on the sesame diet.
Mentions: We next examined the survival curve of mice on sesame diet for a long period. Feeding wild-type mice with sesame seed diet had no effect on survival for at least 3 months (not shown) but PPARα- mice started to die in a few days and all died within 40 days after starting the sesame diet (Figure 1). This drastic effect was age and gender dependent; only male PPARα- mice of older than 14 weeks of age died on the sesame diet. During these periods, weight gain was not observed in wild-type mice and a gradual weight loss was seen in PPARα- mice, indicating that living only on sesame seeds is not healthy even for wild-type mice.

Bottom Line: A detailed analysis of this observation revealed that PPARα is involved in the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants as well as endobiotic substrates by inducing phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes.PPARα plays a vital role in direct or indirect activation of the relevant genes via the complex network among other xenobiotic nuclear receptors.Thus, PPARα plays its wider and more extensive role in energy metabolism from natural food intake to fat storage than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, 2-522-1 Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Plants contain potentially toxic compounds for animals and animals have developed physiological strategies to detoxify the ingested toxins during evolution. Feeding mice with various plant seeds and grains showed unexpected result that only sesame killed PPARα- mice but not wild-type mice at all. A detailed analysis of this observation revealed that PPARα is involved in the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants as well as endobiotic substrates by inducing phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes. PPARα plays a vital role in direct or indirect activation of the relevant genes via the complex network among other xenobiotic nuclear receptors. Thus, PPARα plays its wider and more extensive role in energy metabolism from natural food intake to fat storage than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.