Limits...
Gender Differences Time Trends for Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among Tehranian Children and Adolescents.

Barzin M, Hosseinpanah F, Saber H, Sarbakhsh P, Nakhoda K, Azizi F - Cholesterol (2012)

Bottom Line: The OR of abdominal obesity increased significantly in boys, but no change was observed in girls.Conclusion.Inspite of increasing trend for obesity in both sexes, the trend of MetS decreased in girls and was relatively stable in boys, in Tehranian children, and adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Science, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 1985717413 Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Aims. To investigate the trend of metabolic syndrome and its components in Tehran children and adolescents during a median followup of 6.6 years. Methods. Data from 1999-2001 (phase I), 2002-2005 (phase II), and 2006-2008 (phase III) of the Tehran, Lipid and Glucose Study were analyzed (n = 5439; age 6-18 years) for the trend of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. General estimation equation (GEE) models were used to analyze this correlated data. Results. The crude prevalence of MetS for boys at baseline was 13.2%, which increased to 16.4% in the third phase. In girls, the prevalence of Mets decreased from 11.8% at baseline to 6% during followup. The odd ratios (OR) of obesity over the whole study period were raised in both sexes. The OR of abdominal obesity increased significantly in boys, but no change was observed in girls. No significant OR was observed in boys, while OR for MetS was shown to have a decreasing trend in girls during the followup. In the three time points, the ORs of MetS decreased significantly in girls but no significant difference was observed in boys. Conclusion. Inspite of increasing trend for obesity in both sexes, the trend of MetS decreased in girls and was relatively stable in boys, in Tehranian children, and adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in boys (n = 2643) and girls (n = 2797). Obesity defined as ≥95th percentile of BMI for age and sex; high waist circumference (H-WC) ≥90th percentile for age and sex, according to national reference curves; high blood pressure (H-BP), SBP and/or DBP ≥90th percentile for sex, age and height, from national reference cut-off points; high fasting blood glucose (H-FBG), fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL; high triglycerides (H-TG), fasting TG ≥ 110 mg/dL; low HDL cholesterol (L-HDL), HDL < 40 mg/dL.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345209&req=5

fig1: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in boys (n = 2643) and girls (n = 2797). Obesity defined as ≥95th percentile of BMI for age and sex; high waist circumference (H-WC) ≥90th percentile for age and sex, according to national reference curves; high blood pressure (H-BP), SBP and/or DBP ≥90th percentile for sex, age and height, from national reference cut-off points; high fasting blood glucose (H-FBG), fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL; high triglycerides (H-TG), fasting TG ≥ 110 mg/dL; low HDL cholesterol (L-HDL), HDL < 40 mg/dL.

Mentions: The crude prevalence of obesity increased in both sexes during a median follow-up of 6.6 years. Abdominal obesity increased from 12.3% to 33.1 in phase III in boys, but remained fairly stable in girls. The most frequent component of MetS was low HDL at baseline (39%) that increased up to 47% for boys and 43% for girls in the third phase. High TG was the next most prevalent component that decreased from 35% and 31% at baseline to 21% and 25% in girls and boys, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was 13.2% for boys at baseline that increased to 16.4% in the third phase. In girls, the prevalence of Mets decreased from 11.8% at baseline to 6% during followup (Figure 1).


Gender Differences Time Trends for Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among Tehranian Children and Adolescents.

Barzin M, Hosseinpanah F, Saber H, Sarbakhsh P, Nakhoda K, Azizi F - Cholesterol (2012)

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in boys (n = 2643) and girls (n = 2797). Obesity defined as ≥95th percentile of BMI for age and sex; high waist circumference (H-WC) ≥90th percentile for age and sex, according to national reference curves; high blood pressure (H-BP), SBP and/or DBP ≥90th percentile for sex, age and height, from national reference cut-off points; high fasting blood glucose (H-FBG), fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL; high triglycerides (H-TG), fasting TG ≥ 110 mg/dL; low HDL cholesterol (L-HDL), HDL < 40 mg/dL.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3345209&req=5

fig1: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in boys (n = 2643) and girls (n = 2797). Obesity defined as ≥95th percentile of BMI for age and sex; high waist circumference (H-WC) ≥90th percentile for age and sex, according to national reference curves; high blood pressure (H-BP), SBP and/or DBP ≥90th percentile for sex, age and height, from national reference cut-off points; high fasting blood glucose (H-FBG), fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL; high triglycerides (H-TG), fasting TG ≥ 110 mg/dL; low HDL cholesterol (L-HDL), HDL < 40 mg/dL.
Mentions: The crude prevalence of obesity increased in both sexes during a median follow-up of 6.6 years. Abdominal obesity increased from 12.3% to 33.1 in phase III in boys, but remained fairly stable in girls. The most frequent component of MetS was low HDL at baseline (39%) that increased up to 47% for boys and 43% for girls in the third phase. High TG was the next most prevalent component that decreased from 35% and 31% at baseline to 21% and 25% in girls and boys, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was 13.2% for boys at baseline that increased to 16.4% in the third phase. In girls, the prevalence of Mets decreased from 11.8% at baseline to 6% during followup (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The OR of abdominal obesity increased significantly in boys, but no change was observed in girls.Conclusion.Inspite of increasing trend for obesity in both sexes, the trend of MetS decreased in girls and was relatively stable in boys, in Tehranian children, and adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Science, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 1985717413 Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Aims. To investigate the trend of metabolic syndrome and its components in Tehran children and adolescents during a median followup of 6.6 years. Methods. Data from 1999-2001 (phase I), 2002-2005 (phase II), and 2006-2008 (phase III) of the Tehran, Lipid and Glucose Study were analyzed (n = 5439; age 6-18 years) for the trend of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. General estimation equation (GEE) models were used to analyze this correlated data. Results. The crude prevalence of MetS for boys at baseline was 13.2%, which increased to 16.4% in the third phase. In girls, the prevalence of Mets decreased from 11.8% at baseline to 6% during followup. The odd ratios (OR) of obesity over the whole study period were raised in both sexes. The OR of abdominal obesity increased significantly in boys, but no change was observed in girls. No significant OR was observed in boys, while OR for MetS was shown to have a decreasing trend in girls during the followup. In the three time points, the ORs of MetS decreased significantly in girls but no significant difference was observed in boys. Conclusion. Inspite of increasing trend for obesity in both sexes, the trend of MetS decreased in girls and was relatively stable in boys, in Tehranian children, and adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus