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Health implications of high dietary omega-6 polyunsaturated Fatty acids.

Patterson E, Wall R, Fitzgerald GF, Ross RP, Stanton C - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Bottom Line: Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed "eicosanoids," which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation.In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory.Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show striking increases in the (n-6) to (n-3) ratio (~15 : 1), which are associated with greater metabolism of the n-6 PUFA compared with n-3 PUFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed "eicosanoids," which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show striking increases in the (n-6) to (n-3) ratio (~15 : 1), which are associated with greater metabolism of the n-6 PUFA compared with n-3 PUFA. Coinciding with this increase in the ratio of (n-6) : (n-3) PUFA are increases in chronic inflammatory diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cardiovascular disease, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). By increasing the ratio of (n-3) : (n-6) PUFA in the Western diet, reductions may be achieved in the incidence of these chronic inflammatory diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Metabolism of n-6 and n-3 PUFA. The metabolism of PUFA is a complex process involving several enzymes of desaturation, elongation, and β-oxidation. Shown here is the pathway of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA metabolism to more unsaturated, long-chain members of each family. Also shown are their respective eicosanoid derivatives. Data elaborated from [21].
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fig1: Metabolism of n-6 and n-3 PUFA. The metabolism of PUFA is a complex process involving several enzymes of desaturation, elongation, and β-oxidation. Shown here is the pathway of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA metabolism to more unsaturated, long-chain members of each family. Also shown are their respective eicosanoid derivatives. Data elaborated from [21].

Mentions: Linoleic acid can be metabolized to other more unsaturated, long-chain members of the n-6 family by the insertion of additional double bonds during consecutive elongation and desaturation mechanisms (Figure 1). The initial rate limiting desaturation of LA to GLA is catalysed by the enzyme delta-6-desaturase (FADS2) [19]. Elongation then takes place to convert GLA to DGLA, by elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (ELOVL) 5, and finally a cycle of elongation and desaturation by delta-5-desaturase (FADS1) generates AA [20].


Health implications of high dietary omega-6 polyunsaturated Fatty acids.

Patterson E, Wall R, Fitzgerald GF, Ross RP, Stanton C - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Metabolism of n-6 and n-3 PUFA. The metabolism of PUFA is a complex process involving several enzymes of desaturation, elongation, and β-oxidation. Shown here is the pathway of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA metabolism to more unsaturated, long-chain members of each family. Also shown are their respective eicosanoid derivatives. Data elaborated from [21].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3335257&req=5

fig1: Metabolism of n-6 and n-3 PUFA. The metabolism of PUFA is a complex process involving several enzymes of desaturation, elongation, and β-oxidation. Shown here is the pathway of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA metabolism to more unsaturated, long-chain members of each family. Also shown are their respective eicosanoid derivatives. Data elaborated from [21].
Mentions: Linoleic acid can be metabolized to other more unsaturated, long-chain members of the n-6 family by the insertion of additional double bonds during consecutive elongation and desaturation mechanisms (Figure 1). The initial rate limiting desaturation of LA to GLA is catalysed by the enzyme delta-6-desaturase (FADS2) [19]. Elongation then takes place to convert GLA to DGLA, by elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (ELOVL) 5, and finally a cycle of elongation and desaturation by delta-5-desaturase (FADS1) generates AA [20].

Bottom Line: Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed "eicosanoids," which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation.In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory.Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show striking increases in the (n-6) to (n-3) ratio (~15 : 1), which are associated with greater metabolism of the n-6 PUFA compared with n-3 PUFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed "eicosanoids," which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show striking increases in the (n-6) to (n-3) ratio (~15 : 1), which are associated with greater metabolism of the n-6 PUFA compared with n-3 PUFA. Coinciding with this increase in the ratio of (n-6) : (n-3) PUFA are increases in chronic inflammatory diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cardiovascular disease, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). By increasing the ratio of (n-3) : (n-6) PUFA in the Western diet, reductions may be achieved in the incidence of these chronic inflammatory diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus