Limits...
Led into temptation? Rewarding brand logos bias the neural encoding of incidental economic decisions.

Murawski C, Harris PG, Bode S, Domínguez D JF, Egan GF - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task.Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information.We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Finance, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. carstenm@unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Human decision-making is driven by subjective values assigned to alternative choice options. These valuations are based on reward cues. It is unknown, however, whether complex reward cues, such as brand logos, may bias the neural encoding of subjective value in unrelated decisions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we subliminally presented brand logos preceding intertemporal choices. We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task. This was associated with modulations of the neural encoding of subjective values of choice options in a network of brain regions, including but not restricted to medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information. We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

Show MeSH
Regions in which activation for temporal discounting decisions was parametrically modulated by subjective value (SV).Using two parametric orthogonal regressors for SV and for the trial-by-trial interaction of priming and SV (see Materials and Methods), several regions were identified displaying the interaction, independent from general SV (‘priming interaction model’; displayed in yellow). These were anterior mPFC/ACC, mOFC, left PCC, the caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal sulcus, the IPS (not displayed) and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (not displayed). The only region, which encoded only SV but was not modulated by priming was the left thalamus (displayed in green). Regions displaying specific Apple prime modulation (‘priming premium model’; see Materials and Methods) of SV encoding were anterior mPFC, bilateral premotor cortex, and motor cortices (displayed in cyan). For MNI coordinates and statistics refer to main text.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3316633&req=5

pone-0034155-g004: Regions in which activation for temporal discounting decisions was parametrically modulated by subjective value (SV).Using two parametric orthogonal regressors for SV and for the trial-by-trial interaction of priming and SV (see Materials and Methods), several regions were identified displaying the interaction, independent from general SV (‘priming interaction model’; displayed in yellow). These were anterior mPFC/ACC, mOFC, left PCC, the caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal sulcus, the IPS (not displayed) and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (not displayed). The only region, which encoded only SV but was not modulated by priming was the left thalamus (displayed in green). Regions displaying specific Apple prime modulation (‘priming premium model’; see Materials and Methods) of SV encoding were anterior mPFC, bilateral premotor cortex, and motor cortices (displayed in cyan). For MNI coordinates and statistics refer to main text.

Mentions: Given that priming impacted on choice behavior, our main aim was to identify brain regions that were modulated by the priming effect on SV. First, we conceptualized the priming effect as a parametric interaction of SV and priming, independent of the general parametric effect of SV (‘priming interaction model’, see Materials and Methods). We found that this interaction effect modulated activation in a bilateral network containing anterior medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) extending to frontopolar cortex (FPC, Zmax = 4.83, MNI -12 48 4), medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; Zmax = 4.76, MNI -4 48 -16), the intraparietal sulcus (IPS, Zmax = 4.64, MNI -40 -56 32; Zmax = 3.66, MNI 36 -52 28), posterior cingulate cortex (PPC, Zmax = 4.79, MNI -12 -52 40), caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens (Zmax = 5.02, MNI 0 8 -12), inferior temporal sulcus (ITS, Zmax = 4.72, MNI -64 -44 -4; Zmax = 5.58, MNI 60 -36 -12), and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (mOTS, Zmax = 4.11, MNI -20 -36 -16; Zmax = 4.24, MNI 24 -32 -16) (see Fig. 4). When the interaction between priming and SV was factored out, only a small cluster in the thalamus (Zmax = 3.88, MNI 20, -12, -12) showed parametric activation for prime-independent SV (Fig. 4). Thus, most regions that encoded SV were modulated by the priming effect.


Led into temptation? Rewarding brand logos bias the neural encoding of incidental economic decisions.

Murawski C, Harris PG, Bode S, Domínguez D JF, Egan GF - PLoS ONE (2012)

Regions in which activation for temporal discounting decisions was parametrically modulated by subjective value (SV).Using two parametric orthogonal regressors for SV and for the trial-by-trial interaction of priming and SV (see Materials and Methods), several regions were identified displaying the interaction, independent from general SV (‘priming interaction model’; displayed in yellow). These were anterior mPFC/ACC, mOFC, left PCC, the caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal sulcus, the IPS (not displayed) and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (not displayed). The only region, which encoded only SV but was not modulated by priming was the left thalamus (displayed in green). Regions displaying specific Apple prime modulation (‘priming premium model’; see Materials and Methods) of SV encoding were anterior mPFC, bilateral premotor cortex, and motor cortices (displayed in cyan). For MNI coordinates and statistics refer to main text.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3316633&req=5

pone-0034155-g004: Regions in which activation for temporal discounting decisions was parametrically modulated by subjective value (SV).Using two parametric orthogonal regressors for SV and for the trial-by-trial interaction of priming and SV (see Materials and Methods), several regions were identified displaying the interaction, independent from general SV (‘priming interaction model’; displayed in yellow). These were anterior mPFC/ACC, mOFC, left PCC, the caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal sulcus, the IPS (not displayed) and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (not displayed). The only region, which encoded only SV but was not modulated by priming was the left thalamus (displayed in green). Regions displaying specific Apple prime modulation (‘priming premium model’; see Materials and Methods) of SV encoding were anterior mPFC, bilateral premotor cortex, and motor cortices (displayed in cyan). For MNI coordinates and statistics refer to main text.
Mentions: Given that priming impacted on choice behavior, our main aim was to identify brain regions that were modulated by the priming effect on SV. First, we conceptualized the priming effect as a parametric interaction of SV and priming, independent of the general parametric effect of SV (‘priming interaction model’, see Materials and Methods). We found that this interaction effect modulated activation in a bilateral network containing anterior medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) extending to frontopolar cortex (FPC, Zmax = 4.83, MNI -12 48 4), medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; Zmax = 4.76, MNI -4 48 -16), the intraparietal sulcus (IPS, Zmax = 4.64, MNI -40 -56 32; Zmax = 3.66, MNI 36 -52 28), posterior cingulate cortex (PPC, Zmax = 4.79, MNI -12 -52 40), caudate nucleus/nucleus accumbens (Zmax = 5.02, MNI 0 8 -12), inferior temporal sulcus (ITS, Zmax = 4.72, MNI -64 -44 -4; Zmax = 5.58, MNI 60 -36 -12), and medial occipito-temporal sulcus (mOTS, Zmax = 4.11, MNI -20 -36 -16; Zmax = 4.24, MNI 24 -32 -16) (see Fig. 4). When the interaction between priming and SV was factored out, only a small cluster in the thalamus (Zmax = 3.88, MNI 20, -12, -12) showed parametric activation for prime-independent SV (Fig. 4). Thus, most regions that encoded SV were modulated by the priming effect.

Bottom Line: We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task.Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information.We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Finance, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. carstenm@unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Human decision-making is driven by subjective values assigned to alternative choice options. These valuations are based on reward cues. It is unknown, however, whether complex reward cues, such as brand logos, may bias the neural encoding of subjective value in unrelated decisions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we subliminally presented brand logos preceding intertemporal choices. We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task. This was associated with modulations of the neural encoding of subjective values of choice options in a network of brain regions, including but not restricted to medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information. We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

Show MeSH