Limits...
Automation technology and sense of control: a window on human agency.

Berberian B, Sarrazin JC, Le Blaye P, Haggard P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that the perceived times of voluntary actions and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other, so that the interval between action and outcome seems shortened.However, the generality of this effect remains unclear.We discuss the implications for the underlying mechanisms, and for sense of agency in automated environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Systems Control and Flight Dynamics Department, ONERA, Toulouse, France. bruno.berberian@onera.fr

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that the perceived times of voluntary actions and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other, so that the interval between action and outcome seems shortened. This has been referred to as 'intentional binding' (IB). However, the generality of this effect remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Intentional Binding also occurs in complex control situations. Using an aircraft supervision task with different autopilot settings, our results first indicated a strong relation between measures of IB and different levels of system automation. Second, measures of IB were related to explicit agency judgement in this applied setting. We discuss the implications for the underlying mechanisms, and for sense of agency in automated environments.

Show MeSH
Automation level and cognitive processes in our aircraft navigation task.The red text indicates functions performed by the human operator and black text indicates function performed automatically by the system.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3316600&req=5

pone-0034075-g003: Automation level and cognitive processes in our aircraft navigation task.The red text indicates functions performed by the human operator and black text indicates function performed automatically by the system.

Mentions: In order to meet the task requirement, participants had automation tools to predict conflicts with the surrounding traffic, alert humans of this conflict, and provide commands or guidance to resolve the conflict. In order to study how level of automation affect the sense of agency, automation level was varied between block of trials. In accordance with an established classification [18], four different levels of automation were tested (see Fig. 3) with, from the least automated condition to the more automated condition:


Automation technology and sense of control: a window on human agency.

Berberian B, Sarrazin JC, Le Blaye P, Haggard P - PLoS ONE (2012)

Automation level and cognitive processes in our aircraft navigation task.The red text indicates functions performed by the human operator and black text indicates function performed automatically by the system.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3316600&req=5

pone-0034075-g003: Automation level and cognitive processes in our aircraft navigation task.The red text indicates functions performed by the human operator and black text indicates function performed automatically by the system.
Mentions: In order to meet the task requirement, participants had automation tools to predict conflicts with the surrounding traffic, alert humans of this conflict, and provide commands or guidance to resolve the conflict. In order to study how level of automation affect the sense of agency, automation level was varied between block of trials. In accordance with an established classification [18], four different levels of automation were tested (see Fig. 3) with, from the least automated condition to the more automated condition:

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that the perceived times of voluntary actions and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other, so that the interval between action and outcome seems shortened.However, the generality of this effect remains unclear.We discuss the implications for the underlying mechanisms, and for sense of agency in automated environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Systems Control and Flight Dynamics Department, ONERA, Toulouse, France. bruno.berberian@onera.fr

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that the perceived times of voluntary actions and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other, so that the interval between action and outcome seems shortened. This has been referred to as 'intentional binding' (IB). However, the generality of this effect remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Intentional Binding also occurs in complex control situations. Using an aircraft supervision task with different autopilot settings, our results first indicated a strong relation between measures of IB and different levels of system automation. Second, measures of IB were related to explicit agency judgement in this applied setting. We discuss the implications for the underlying mechanisms, and for sense of agency in automated environments.

Show MeSH