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Hunches on hunchbacks.

Seshadri KG - Indian J Endocrinol Metab (2012)

Bottom Line: The hunchback has long been a symbol of revilement in art and literature.This write up tries to find the cause of the deformity into two iconic hunchbacks in literature, Manthara and Quasimodo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism, Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, India.

ABSTRACT
The hunchback has long been a symbol of revilement in art and literature. This write up tries to find the cause of the deformity into two iconic hunchbacks in literature, Manthara and Quasimodo.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Manthara and Kaikeyi
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Figure 1: Manthara and Kaikeyi

Mentions: Let us start with a familiar icon: Manthara [Figure 1], called “kooni” because her spine was bent. Valmiki introduces us to Manthara in sarga 7 of the Ayodhya Kanda.[1] He uses the term “Kubjayai;” kubja[2] translates as humpback or crooked (or the Latin Gibbus). Valmiki does not elaborate on her illness further other than calling her “papa darshini” (purveyor of sin). We have to look to other sources for Manthara and her deformity's origins. The Padma Purana tells us that she was a gandharva woman sent down specifically to ensure that Rama ends up in the forest and fulfills his destiny. She had accompanied Kaikeyi from her parent's house – no mention if she had a humpback then. Kamba (in his rendition of the Ramayana), while seeking to explain Manthara's contempt for Rama, digs in to his childhood and finds an episode when Rama used to hit Manthara's hump with balls of clay. By Kamba's rendition, she had the hump for at least 20 years – does not sound like an osteoporotic fracture; the caveat is that Manthara had been with Kaikeyi since her birth (probably her wet nurse too) and Kaikeyi did not have a child for quite a long time. Manthara was probably quite old by the time Rama used her back to practice archery, leaving the osteoporosis door open.


Hunches on hunchbacks.

Seshadri KG - Indian J Endocrinol Metab (2012)

Manthara and Kaikeyi
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3313752&req=5

Figure 1: Manthara and Kaikeyi
Mentions: Let us start with a familiar icon: Manthara [Figure 1], called “kooni” because her spine was bent. Valmiki introduces us to Manthara in sarga 7 of the Ayodhya Kanda.[1] He uses the term “Kubjayai;” kubja[2] translates as humpback or crooked (or the Latin Gibbus). Valmiki does not elaborate on her illness further other than calling her “papa darshini” (purveyor of sin). We have to look to other sources for Manthara and her deformity's origins. The Padma Purana tells us that she was a gandharva woman sent down specifically to ensure that Rama ends up in the forest and fulfills his destiny. She had accompanied Kaikeyi from her parent's house – no mention if she had a humpback then. Kamba (in his rendition of the Ramayana), while seeking to explain Manthara's contempt for Rama, digs in to his childhood and finds an episode when Rama used to hit Manthara's hump with balls of clay. By Kamba's rendition, she had the hump for at least 20 years – does not sound like an osteoporotic fracture; the caveat is that Manthara had been with Kaikeyi since her birth (probably her wet nurse too) and Kaikeyi did not have a child for quite a long time. Manthara was probably quite old by the time Rama used her back to practice archery, leaving the osteoporosis door open.

Bottom Line: The hunchback has long been a symbol of revilement in art and literature.This write up tries to find the cause of the deformity into two iconic hunchbacks in literature, Manthara and Quasimodo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism, Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, India.

ABSTRACT
The hunchback has long been a symbol of revilement in art and literature. This write up tries to find the cause of the deformity into two iconic hunchbacks in literature, Manthara and Quasimodo.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus