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Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

Miyata Y, Minami M, Onbe S, Sakamoto M, Matsuzaki H, Nakamura T, Imamura M - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2011)

Bottom Line: We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis.We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis.Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Chronological Research (CCR), Nagoya University, Japan. miyata@nendai.nayoya-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

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Differences in radiocarbon ages of carbonized materials from the inner and outer surfaces of potsherds from the Irienaiko archaeological site. Sample SGMB 4232b was excluded from the statistical calculations.
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fig03: Differences in radiocarbon ages of carbonized materials from the inner and outer surfaces of potsherds from the Irienaiko archaeological site. Sample SGMB 4232b was excluded from the statistical calculations.

Mentions: The radiocarbon ages of the carbonized materials clearly differed between the inner and outer surfaces of the potsherds (Fig. 3). Material from the inner surface (mean age 5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) was about 90 14C years older than that from the outer surface (mean age 4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). Only one pair of radiocarbon dates from the inner and outer surfaces of a single potsherd did not clearly show the 90 14C age difference because the age difference was less than the radiocarbon measurement error of ±25–40.


Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

Miyata Y, Minami M, Onbe S, Sakamoto M, Matsuzaki H, Nakamura T, Imamura M - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2011)

Differences in radiocarbon ages of carbonized materials from the inner and outer surfaces of potsherds from the Irienaiko archaeological site. Sample SGMB 4232b was excluded from the statistical calculations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3313692&req=5

fig03: Differences in radiocarbon ages of carbonized materials from the inner and outer surfaces of potsherds from the Irienaiko archaeological site. Sample SGMB 4232b was excluded from the statistical calculations.
Mentions: The radiocarbon ages of the carbonized materials clearly differed between the inner and outer surfaces of the potsherds (Fig. 3). Material from the inner surface (mean age 5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) was about 90 14C years older than that from the outer surface (mean age 4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). Only one pair of radiocarbon dates from the inner and outer surfaces of a single potsherd did not clearly show the 90 14C age difference because the age difference was less than the radiocarbon measurement error of ±25–40.

Bottom Line: We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis.We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis.Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Chronological Research (CCR), Nagoya University, Japan. miyata@nendai.nayoya-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus