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Earthquake-induced soil displacements and their impact on rehabilitations.

Konagai K - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2011)

Bottom Line: Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms.An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent.This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan. konagai@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
A large earthquake can trigger long lasting geotechnical problems, which pose serious issues on both rehabilitations and land conservations. Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms. Though serious, damage caused by the October 23rd 2004, Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake has given us a rare opportunity to study the landform changes in mountainous terrain hit by this earthquake. An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent. This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Actual water levels at all bench marks reached in the 2005 flood, and the virtual water levels for the Uono River as existed before the earthquake.7)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig07: Actual water levels at all bench marks reached in the 2005 flood, and the virtual water levels for the Uono River as existed before the earthquake.7)

Mentions: Areas along the upper reach of this part of the Uono River were flooded due to heavy rainfall of June 27th–28th, 2005, about 8 months after the earthquake (Fig. 6). Assuming that the same amount of water in the 2005 rain flowed down the Uono River as existed before the earthquake (ignoring the landform changes caused by the Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake), possible water depths at all bench marks along the 57.5 km-long flooded zone (from bench marks No. 15 at 37.26642°N, 138.862209°E, to No. 72.5 at 37.25923°N, 138.899975°E) were estimated by using the Manning empirical equation12) (open circles in Fig. 7). For this estimation, precise dimensions for the river cross-sections and inclinations at all benchmarks before and after the earthquake were provided by the Shinano River Office, Hokuriku Regional Bureau of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT).


Earthquake-induced soil displacements and their impact on rehabilitations.

Konagai K - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2011)

Actual water levels at all bench marks reached in the 2005 flood, and the virtual water levels for the Uono River as existed before the earthquake.7)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3313688&req=5

fig07: Actual water levels at all bench marks reached in the 2005 flood, and the virtual water levels for the Uono River as existed before the earthquake.7)
Mentions: Areas along the upper reach of this part of the Uono River were flooded due to heavy rainfall of June 27th–28th, 2005, about 8 months after the earthquake (Fig. 6). Assuming that the same amount of water in the 2005 rain flowed down the Uono River as existed before the earthquake (ignoring the landform changes caused by the Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake), possible water depths at all bench marks along the 57.5 km-long flooded zone (from bench marks No. 15 at 37.26642°N, 138.862209°E, to No. 72.5 at 37.25923°N, 138.899975°E) were estimated by using the Manning empirical equation12) (open circles in Fig. 7). For this estimation, precise dimensions for the river cross-sections and inclinations at all benchmarks before and after the earthquake were provided by the Shinano River Office, Hokuriku Regional Bureau of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT).

Bottom Line: Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms.An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent.This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan. konagai@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
A large earthquake can trigger long lasting geotechnical problems, which pose serious issues on both rehabilitations and land conservations. Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms. Though serious, damage caused by the October 23rd 2004, Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake has given us a rare opportunity to study the landform changes in mountainous terrain hit by this earthquake. An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent. This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus