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Changes in stroke research productivity: A global perspective.

Chow DS, Hauptman JS, Wong TT, Gonzalez NR, Martin NA, Lignelli AA, Itagaki MW - Surg Neurol Int (2012)

Bottom Line: Growth was analyzed by using linear and nonlinear regression.Total articles numbered 32,309 during the study period, with leading global contributors including the United States with 8795 (27.2%) articles, Japan with 2757 (8.5%) articles, and the United Kingdom with 2629 (8.1%) articles.Growth globally and in the United States followed a linear pattern at 209.9 and 56.2 articles per year, respectively (both P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: While stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide, little work has been done to quantify the growth and progress of stroke publications. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively analyze trends in the stroke literature over the past 12 years, specifically examining changes in worldwide productivity and study methodology.

Methods: The study was a retrospective bibliometric analysis of all stroke articles published between 1996 and 2008 indexed in MEDLINE. Country of origin, MEDLINE-defined methodology, specialty of the first author, and funding sources (for US articles) were recorded. Growth was analyzed by using linear and nonlinear regression.

Results: Total articles numbered 32,309 during the study period, with leading global contributors including the United States with 8795 (27.2%) articles, Japan with 2757 (8.5%) articles, and the United Kingdom with 2629 (8.1%) articles. Growth globally and in the United States followed a linear pattern at 209.9 and 56.2 articles per year, respectively (both P < 0.001). Review articles and clinical trials numbered 5932 (18.4%) and 2934 (9.1%), respectively. Clinical trials followed an exponential growth pattern of 7.7% per year (P < 0.001). Regarding specialty influence, pain management and rehabilitation had the largest proportional growth in clinical trials from 4 to 51 articles.

Conclusions: Within the stroke literature, we observed continued growth worldwide, sustained growth in the United States, and a steady increase in the number of clinical trials, especially by pain management and rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


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Trends in NIH-funded publications versus unfunded US publications, between 1996 and 2008
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Figure 4: Trends in NIH-funded publications versus unfunded US publications, between 1996 and 2008

Mentions: Of the publications originating from the United States, 2834 (32.2%) received NIH grant support. The fraction of published articles that received NIH support varied by article type. For example, while the NIH supported 300 of 710 (42.3%) clinical trials and 83 of 177 (46.9%) multicenter studies, it only supported 108 of 1069 (10.1%) case reports and 372 of 2144 (17.4%) review articles. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded 1569 (55.4%) of NIH studies, followed by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) which funded 579 (20.4%) studies. NIH-funded publications grew from 97 to 341 between 1996 and 2008. Non–NIH-funded US publications grew from 236 to 665 between 1996 and 2008. Regarding funding, relative contribution of NIH-funded publications increased from 29.1 to 33.9% between 1996 and 2008 [Figure 4].


Changes in stroke research productivity: A global perspective.

Chow DS, Hauptman JS, Wong TT, Gonzalez NR, Martin NA, Lignelli AA, Itagaki MW - Surg Neurol Int (2012)

Trends in NIH-funded publications versus unfunded US publications, between 1996 and 2008
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3307235&req=5

Figure 4: Trends in NIH-funded publications versus unfunded US publications, between 1996 and 2008
Mentions: Of the publications originating from the United States, 2834 (32.2%) received NIH grant support. The fraction of published articles that received NIH support varied by article type. For example, while the NIH supported 300 of 710 (42.3%) clinical trials and 83 of 177 (46.9%) multicenter studies, it only supported 108 of 1069 (10.1%) case reports and 372 of 2144 (17.4%) review articles. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded 1569 (55.4%) of NIH studies, followed by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) which funded 579 (20.4%) studies. NIH-funded publications grew from 97 to 341 between 1996 and 2008. Non–NIH-funded US publications grew from 236 to 665 between 1996 and 2008. Regarding funding, relative contribution of NIH-funded publications increased from 29.1 to 33.9% between 1996 and 2008 [Figure 4].

Bottom Line: Growth was analyzed by using linear and nonlinear regression.Total articles numbered 32,309 during the study period, with leading global contributors including the United States with 8795 (27.2%) articles, Japan with 2757 (8.5%) articles, and the United Kingdom with 2629 (8.1%) articles.Growth globally and in the United States followed a linear pattern at 209.9 and 56.2 articles per year, respectively (both P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: While stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide, little work has been done to quantify the growth and progress of stroke publications. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively analyze trends in the stroke literature over the past 12 years, specifically examining changes in worldwide productivity and study methodology.

Methods: The study was a retrospective bibliometric analysis of all stroke articles published between 1996 and 2008 indexed in MEDLINE. Country of origin, MEDLINE-defined methodology, specialty of the first author, and funding sources (for US articles) were recorded. Growth was analyzed by using linear and nonlinear regression.

Results: Total articles numbered 32,309 during the study period, with leading global contributors including the United States with 8795 (27.2%) articles, Japan with 2757 (8.5%) articles, and the United Kingdom with 2629 (8.1%) articles. Growth globally and in the United States followed a linear pattern at 209.9 and 56.2 articles per year, respectively (both P < 0.001). Review articles and clinical trials numbered 5932 (18.4%) and 2934 (9.1%), respectively. Clinical trials followed an exponential growth pattern of 7.7% per year (P < 0.001). Regarding specialty influence, pain management and rehabilitation had the largest proportional growth in clinical trials from 4 to 51 articles.

Conclusions: Within the stroke literature, we observed continued growth worldwide, sustained growth in the United States, and a steady increase in the number of clinical trials, especially by pain management and rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus