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Acute Concomitant Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon Tears in a Non-dislocated Knee.

Wissman RD, Vonfischer N, Kempf K - J Clin Imaging Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common and may occur in isolation or with other internal derangements of the joint.Tears of the patellar tendon (PT) occur less frequently and are rarely associated with intra-articular pathology.Acute combined tears of both the ACL and PT are known complications of high-energy traumatic knee dislocations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common and may occur in isolation or with other internal derangements of the joint. Tears of the patellar tendon (PT) occur less frequently and are rarely associated with intra-articular pathology. Acute combined tears of both the ACL and PT are known complications of high-energy traumatic knee dislocations. We present a case of an acute concomitant ACL and PT tears in a low-energy non-dislocated knee. To our knowledge, this injury has only been described in a limited number of case reports in the orthopedic literature. We present the imaging findings of this combined injury and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance (MR) in diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lateral radiograph of the right knee following the initial injury demonstrates a large suprapatellar joint effusion (asterisk) and undulating contour of the patellar tendon (arrow).
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Figure 1: Lateral radiograph of the right knee following the initial injury demonstrates a large suprapatellar joint effusion (asterisk) and undulating contour of the patellar tendon (arrow).

Mentions: A 36-year-old female jumped from a four-foot high deck landing flatly on both feet. She felt a pop in the right knee and experienced extreme pain and inability to bear weight on the limb. She sought emergency medical attention where radiographs revealed a joint effusion, and a wavy appearance to the tendon [Figure 1]. There was no patellar elevation, fracture or malalignment. Clinically the patient was believed to have an ACL tear. The patient was treated with a knee brace and instructed to follow-up with an orthopedic surgeon and obtain an MR examination of the knee.


Acute Concomitant Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon Tears in a Non-dislocated Knee.

Wissman RD, Vonfischer N, Kempf K - J Clin Imaging Sci (2012)

Lateral radiograph of the right knee following the initial injury demonstrates a large suprapatellar joint effusion (asterisk) and undulating contour of the patellar tendon (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3307214&req=5

Figure 1: Lateral radiograph of the right knee following the initial injury demonstrates a large suprapatellar joint effusion (asterisk) and undulating contour of the patellar tendon (arrow).
Mentions: A 36-year-old female jumped from a four-foot high deck landing flatly on both feet. She felt a pop in the right knee and experienced extreme pain and inability to bear weight on the limb. She sought emergency medical attention where radiographs revealed a joint effusion, and a wavy appearance to the tendon [Figure 1]. There was no patellar elevation, fracture or malalignment. Clinically the patient was believed to have an ACL tear. The patient was treated with a knee brace and instructed to follow-up with an orthopedic surgeon and obtain an MR examination of the knee.

Bottom Line: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common and may occur in isolation or with other internal derangements of the joint.Tears of the patellar tendon (PT) occur less frequently and are rarely associated with intra-articular pathology.Acute combined tears of both the ACL and PT are known complications of high-energy traumatic knee dislocations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common and may occur in isolation or with other internal derangements of the joint. Tears of the patellar tendon (PT) occur less frequently and are rarely associated with intra-articular pathology. Acute combined tears of both the ACL and PT are known complications of high-energy traumatic knee dislocations. We present a case of an acute concomitant ACL and PT tears in a low-energy non-dislocated knee. To our knowledge, this injury has only been described in a limited number of case reports in the orthopedic literature. We present the imaging findings of this combined injury and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance (MR) in diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus