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Species-Specific Flight Styles of Flies are Reflected in the Response Dynamics of a Homolog Motion-Sensitive Neuron.

Geurten BR, Kern R, Egelhaaf M - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron.The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog.It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Bielefeld University Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Hoverflies and blowflies have distinctly different flight styles. Yet, both species have been shown to structure their flight behavior in a way that facilitates extraction of 3D information from the image flow on the retina (optic flow). Neuronal candidates to analyze the optic flow are the tangential cells in the third optical ganglion - the lobula complex. These neurons are directionally selective and integrate the optic flow over large parts of the visual field. Homolog tangential cells in hoverflies and blowflies have a similar morphology. Because blowflies and hoverflies have similar neuronal layout but distinctly different flight behaviors, they are an ideal substrate to pinpoint potential neuronal adaptations to the different flight styles. In this article we describe the relationship between locomotion behavior and motion vision on three different levels: (1) We compare the different flight styles based on the categorization of flight behavior into prototypical movements. (2) We measure the species-specific dynamics of the optic flow under naturalistic flight conditions. We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron. We stimulate this cell in blowflies (Calliphora) and hoverflies (Eristalis) with naturalistic optic flow generated by both species during free flight. The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog. It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean optic flow induced by prototypical movements. Optic flow calculated geometrical from head trajectories of both species. The red arrows are scaled differently than the blue ones (they code for four times the velocity of the blue arrows). A field of view of 120° elevation is depicted. The mean optic flow for each prototypical movement was calculated (numeration as in Figure 1). In the lower left corner of each flow field the corresponding PM is shown. (A)Eristalis optic flow calculated with head trajectories and segregated after body PMs. (B)Calliphora optic flow calculated from head trajectories and segregated after head PMs.
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Figure 3: Mean optic flow induced by prototypical movements. Optic flow calculated geometrical from head trajectories of both species. The red arrows are scaled differently than the blue ones (they code for four times the velocity of the blue arrows). A field of view of 120° elevation is depicted. The mean optic flow for each prototypical movement was calculated (numeration as in Figure 1). In the lower left corner of each flow field the corresponding PM is shown. (A)Eristalis optic flow calculated with head trajectories and segregated after body PMs. (B)Calliphora optic flow calculated from head trajectories and segregated after head PMs.

Mentions: The different flight styles of hoverflies and blowflies manifest themselves in partly large differences of the optic flow evoked by the different PMs (Figure 3). These PM-triggered flow fields were obtained by the following procedure: The optic flow for all positions and trajectories was acquired by using the Koenderink algorithm (Koenderink, 1986). The Koenderink algorithm uses the 3D structure of the world and calculates geometrically the optic flow vectors. We projected these vectors onto a cylindrical coordinate system, as can be seen in Figure 3. We then used the PM assignment for each trajectory position to calculate the mean optic flow over all flow fields elicited by one PM (see Figure 3).


Species-Specific Flight Styles of Flies are Reflected in the Response Dynamics of a Homolog Motion-Sensitive Neuron.

Geurten BR, Kern R, Egelhaaf M - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Mean optic flow induced by prototypical movements. Optic flow calculated geometrical from head trajectories of both species. The red arrows are scaled differently than the blue ones (they code for four times the velocity of the blue arrows). A field of view of 120° elevation is depicted. The mean optic flow for each prototypical movement was calculated (numeration as in Figure 1). In the lower left corner of each flow field the corresponding PM is shown. (A)Eristalis optic flow calculated with head trajectories and segregated after body PMs. (B)Calliphora optic flow calculated from head trajectories and segregated after head PMs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3307035&req=5

Figure 3: Mean optic flow induced by prototypical movements. Optic flow calculated geometrical from head trajectories of both species. The red arrows are scaled differently than the blue ones (they code for four times the velocity of the blue arrows). A field of view of 120° elevation is depicted. The mean optic flow for each prototypical movement was calculated (numeration as in Figure 1). In the lower left corner of each flow field the corresponding PM is shown. (A)Eristalis optic flow calculated with head trajectories and segregated after body PMs. (B)Calliphora optic flow calculated from head trajectories and segregated after head PMs.
Mentions: The different flight styles of hoverflies and blowflies manifest themselves in partly large differences of the optic flow evoked by the different PMs (Figure 3). These PM-triggered flow fields were obtained by the following procedure: The optic flow for all positions and trajectories was acquired by using the Koenderink algorithm (Koenderink, 1986). The Koenderink algorithm uses the 3D structure of the world and calculates geometrically the optic flow vectors. We projected these vectors onto a cylindrical coordinate system, as can be seen in Figure 3. We then used the PM assignment for each trajectory position to calculate the mean optic flow over all flow fields elicited by one PM (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron.The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog.It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Bielefeld University Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Hoverflies and blowflies have distinctly different flight styles. Yet, both species have been shown to structure their flight behavior in a way that facilitates extraction of 3D information from the image flow on the retina (optic flow). Neuronal candidates to analyze the optic flow are the tangential cells in the third optical ganglion - the lobula complex. These neurons are directionally selective and integrate the optic flow over large parts of the visual field. Homolog tangential cells in hoverflies and blowflies have a similar morphology. Because blowflies and hoverflies have similar neuronal layout but distinctly different flight behaviors, they are an ideal substrate to pinpoint potential neuronal adaptations to the different flight styles. In this article we describe the relationship between locomotion behavior and motion vision on three different levels: (1) We compare the different flight styles based on the categorization of flight behavior into prototypical movements. (2) We measure the species-specific dynamics of the optic flow under naturalistic flight conditions. We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron. We stimulate this cell in blowflies (Calliphora) and hoverflies (Eristalis) with naturalistic optic flow generated by both species during free flight. The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog. It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus