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Species-Specific Flight Styles of Flies are Reflected in the Response Dynamics of a Homolog Motion-Sensitive Neuron.

Geurten BR, Kern R, Egelhaaf M - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron.The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog.It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Bielefeld University Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Hoverflies and blowflies have distinctly different flight styles. Yet, both species have been shown to structure their flight behavior in a way that facilitates extraction of 3D information from the image flow on the retina (optic flow). Neuronal candidates to analyze the optic flow are the tangential cells in the third optical ganglion - the lobula complex. These neurons are directionally selective and integrate the optic flow over large parts of the visual field. Homolog tangential cells in hoverflies and blowflies have a similar morphology. Because blowflies and hoverflies have similar neuronal layout but distinctly different flight behaviors, they are an ideal substrate to pinpoint potential neuronal adaptations to the different flight styles. In this article we describe the relationship between locomotion behavior and motion vision on three different levels: (1) We compare the different flight styles based on the categorization of flight behavior into prototypical movements. (2) We measure the species-specific dynamics of the optic flow under naturalistic flight conditions. We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron. We stimulate this cell in blowflies (Calliphora) and hoverflies (Eristalis) with naturalistic optic flow generated by both species during free flight. The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog. It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prototypical movements. Prototypical movements (PMs) of blowflies and hoverflies in confined arenas. Each translational velocity (forward, upward, sideways) is normalized to the absolute maximum of all translational velocities. The rotational velocities (yaw, pitch, roll) were normalized accordingly. The velocities are plotted as length of the arrows around a position. The gray arrows show the normalized maximum velocity. The colored arrows show the velocity combination for that PM (for color code see inset). The PMs are numbered. Below the PM number are its percentage in the data and its mean duration ± SD. (A)Eristalis PMs derived from body trajectories omitting roll velocities, which we could not track for a larger dataset (see Materials and Methods). (B)Calliphora PMs derived from head trajectories (Braun et al., 2010).
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Figure 1: Prototypical movements. Prototypical movements (PMs) of blowflies and hoverflies in confined arenas. Each translational velocity (forward, upward, sideways) is normalized to the absolute maximum of all translational velocities. The rotational velocities (yaw, pitch, roll) were normalized accordingly. The velocities are plotted as length of the arrows around a position. The gray arrows show the normalized maximum velocity. The colored arrows show the velocity combination for that PM (for color code see inset). The PMs are numbered. Below the PM number are its percentage in the data and its mean duration ± SD. (A)Eristalis PMs derived from body trajectories omitting roll velocities, which we could not track for a larger dataset (see Materials and Methods). (B)Calliphora PMs derived from head trajectories (Braun et al., 2010).

Mentions: The set of nine Eristalis PMs can be divided into three subgroups (Figure 1A; Geurten et al., 2010). The first subgroup contains saccadic PMs, covering fast yaw rotations (PMs 1 and 2, see numbers in Figure 1A). The second subgroup consists of forward–sideways movements (PMs 3 and 4). The third subgroup contains all other movements, for example upward movements (PM 5), backward movement (PM 6), or hovering (PM 9). The set of Calliphora’s PMs (see Figure 1B) differs from that of Eristalis in many respects, but contains nine PMs as well (Braun et al., 2010). Four rotational PMs (PMs 1–4) correspond to saccades. Four forward–sideways movements (PMs 5–8) form the second subgroup. The last PM is directed purely forward (PM 9). All Calliphora PMs contain a strong translational forward component, which is absent in several Eristalis PMs (PMs 2, 5, and 9). Backward PMs occur only in Eristalis (PM 6). In any case, although both flies have in common that their PMs can be segregated into rotational and translational ones, their translational PMs differ much.


Species-Specific Flight Styles of Flies are Reflected in the Response Dynamics of a Homolog Motion-Sensitive Neuron.

Geurten BR, Kern R, Egelhaaf M - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Prototypical movements. Prototypical movements (PMs) of blowflies and hoverflies in confined arenas. Each translational velocity (forward, upward, sideways) is normalized to the absolute maximum of all translational velocities. The rotational velocities (yaw, pitch, roll) were normalized accordingly. The velocities are plotted as length of the arrows around a position. The gray arrows show the normalized maximum velocity. The colored arrows show the velocity combination for that PM (for color code see inset). The PMs are numbered. Below the PM number are its percentage in the data and its mean duration ± SD. (A)Eristalis PMs derived from body trajectories omitting roll velocities, which we could not track for a larger dataset (see Materials and Methods). (B)Calliphora PMs derived from head trajectories (Braun et al., 2010).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3307035&req=5

Figure 1: Prototypical movements. Prototypical movements (PMs) of blowflies and hoverflies in confined arenas. Each translational velocity (forward, upward, sideways) is normalized to the absolute maximum of all translational velocities. The rotational velocities (yaw, pitch, roll) were normalized accordingly. The velocities are plotted as length of the arrows around a position. The gray arrows show the normalized maximum velocity. The colored arrows show the velocity combination for that PM (for color code see inset). The PMs are numbered. Below the PM number are its percentage in the data and its mean duration ± SD. (A)Eristalis PMs derived from body trajectories omitting roll velocities, which we could not track for a larger dataset (see Materials and Methods). (B)Calliphora PMs derived from head trajectories (Braun et al., 2010).
Mentions: The set of nine Eristalis PMs can be divided into three subgroups (Figure 1A; Geurten et al., 2010). The first subgroup contains saccadic PMs, covering fast yaw rotations (PMs 1 and 2, see numbers in Figure 1A). The second subgroup consists of forward–sideways movements (PMs 3 and 4). The third subgroup contains all other movements, for example upward movements (PM 5), backward movement (PM 6), or hovering (PM 9). The set of Calliphora’s PMs (see Figure 1B) differs from that of Eristalis in many respects, but contains nine PMs as well (Braun et al., 2010). Four rotational PMs (PMs 1–4) correspond to saccades. Four forward–sideways movements (PMs 5–8) form the second subgroup. The last PM is directed purely forward (PM 9). All Calliphora PMs contain a strong translational forward component, which is absent in several Eristalis PMs (PMs 2, 5, and 9). Backward PMs occur only in Eristalis (PM 6). In any case, although both flies have in common that their PMs can be segregated into rotational and translational ones, their translational PMs differ much.

Bottom Line: We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron.The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog.It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Bielefeld University Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Hoverflies and blowflies have distinctly different flight styles. Yet, both species have been shown to structure their flight behavior in a way that facilitates extraction of 3D information from the image flow on the retina (optic flow). Neuronal candidates to analyze the optic flow are the tangential cells in the third optical ganglion - the lobula complex. These neurons are directionally selective and integrate the optic flow over large parts of the visual field. Homolog tangential cells in hoverflies and blowflies have a similar morphology. Because blowflies and hoverflies have similar neuronal layout but distinctly different flight behaviors, they are an ideal substrate to pinpoint potential neuronal adaptations to the different flight styles. In this article we describe the relationship between locomotion behavior and motion vision on three different levels: (1) We compare the different flight styles based on the categorization of flight behavior into prototypical movements. (2) We measure the species-specific dynamics of the optic flow under naturalistic flight conditions. We found the translational optic flow of both species to be very different. (3) We describe possible adaptations of a homolog motion-sensitive neuron. We stimulate this cell in blowflies (Calliphora) and hoverflies (Eristalis) with naturalistic optic flow generated by both species during free flight. The characterized hoverfly tangential cell responds faster to transient changes in the optic flow than its blowfly homolog. It is discussed whether and how the different dynamical response properties aid optic flow analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus