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Thymus atrophy and double-positive escape are common features in infectious diseases.

de Meis J, Aurélio Farias-de-Oliveira D, Nunes Panzenhagen PH, Maran N, Villa-Verde DM, Morrot A, Savino W - J Parasitol Res (2012)

Bottom Line: This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents.This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents.We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory on Thymus Research, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Avenue Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ in which bone marrow-derived T-cell precursors undergo differentiation, leading to migration of positively selected thymocytes to the T-cell-dependent areas of secondary lymphoid organs. This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents. This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents. We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

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Mentions: Glucocorticoid hormones are strong candidates to promote thymic atrophy and thymocyte death in parasitic infections. Serum glucocorticoid levels are upregulated in acute infections and promote DP thymocyte apoptosis through caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation [9, 56, 57, 65, 66] (Box 1). Such rise in serum glucocorticoids has been reported in experimental parasitic diseases such as malaria, American tripanosomiases or Chagas disease, African trypanosomiases or sleeping sickness, toxoplasmosis, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis [51, 56, 67–72]. In experimental acute T. cruzi infection, thymic atrophy and thymocyte depletion have been associated with both TNF and glucocorticoid serum levels [44, 65, 73].


Thymus atrophy and double-positive escape are common features in infectious diseases.

de Meis J, Aurélio Farias-de-Oliveira D, Nunes Panzenhagen PH, Maran N, Villa-Verde DM, Morrot A, Savino W - J Parasitol Res (2012)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3307005&req=5

Mentions: Glucocorticoid hormones are strong candidates to promote thymic atrophy and thymocyte death in parasitic infections. Serum glucocorticoid levels are upregulated in acute infections and promote DP thymocyte apoptosis through caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation [9, 56, 57, 65, 66] (Box 1). Such rise in serum glucocorticoids has been reported in experimental parasitic diseases such as malaria, American tripanosomiases or Chagas disease, African trypanosomiases or sleeping sickness, toxoplasmosis, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis [51, 56, 67–72]. In experimental acute T. cruzi infection, thymic atrophy and thymocyte depletion have been associated with both TNF and glucocorticoid serum levels [44, 65, 73].

Bottom Line: This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents.This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents.We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory on Thymus Research, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Avenue Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ in which bone marrow-derived T-cell precursors undergo differentiation, leading to migration of positively selected thymocytes to the T-cell-dependent areas of secondary lymphoid organs. This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents. This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents. We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus